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Spending Money Wisely
Spending Money Wisely

How to Save Money When You Buy a Home in Idaho

Buying a home is one of the biggest decisions a person can make. It’s the culmination of years of intense saving and budgeting, months of open houses, and weeks of late-night strategizing and offer planning.

In 2020, buying a home has gotten even harder as the COVID-19 pandemic has swept across the United States. Shopping for real estate during a crisis has always been difficult, but necessary safety measures taken to stop the spread of the virus have had a noticeable impact on how most people shop for homes.

One silver lining of this unfortunate situation is that many people in the real estate industry are finally seeing how technology makes the home buying process easier on both buyers and sellers. At Homie, we understand how technology like ours can help buyers and sellers save time and money. Let’s explore how you can leverage technology and other strategies to save money when you buy a home.

Get Your Finances in Order

If you’re thinking of buying a home, the first thing you should do is take a long, hard look at your finances. The two most important financial factors are the amount you have saved for a down payment and your debt-to-income ratio.

The down payment amount is simple. Most of us grew up thinking that 20% was standard, but that isn’t the case anymore. According to a 2017 industry survey, most homeowners only pay 7% down. Let’s all breathe a collective sigh of relief! With the average home value in Idaho rising every year, it’s a huge relief to know that you don’t have to save the full 20% down payment.

While you’re saving for the down payment, you also need to think about your debt-to-income ratio (DTI). This value compares what you make each month to what you owe. You can still buy a house if you have debt from student loans or another source, but you need to ensure your DTI is as low as possible, preferably at or below the 28% standard.

Get a Great Deal on a Loan

Once you’ve gotten your finances in order, you can start exploring mortgage rates and loans. Most people start with their bank. That’s a good start. However, they often make a critical mistake: they don’t shop around for a good rate. If you only check at your bank, you’re missing great deals from companies like Homie Loans™. They’re so confident no one else can beat their locked loan rate that they’ll give you $500 cash if you find a better deal.

Homie Loans doesn’t just give you a good rate, the entire application online, so you don’t even have to leave the house to get approved.

Explore Federal Loan Programs

In addition to shopping around for a great mortgage rate at private companies and commercial banks, you can save tons of money by checking out your options for federal home buyer programs.

These programs are designed by the government and government agencies to ease the burden of homeownership. Each program is different: some require applicants to fall into certain income thresholds, while others are designed to assist veterans or individuals looking to buy homes in rural areas.

Idaho-Specific Programs for Down Payment and Cost Assistance

In addition to exploring federal home loan programs, many state agencies in Idaho have these programs available to residents. The Department of Housing and Urban Development has state-by-state guides for homeownership assistance programs, and lists many area-specific programs throughout Idaho.

Depending on where you live, you may be able to find specific assistance for homeowners in your region. These programs may be smaller, but since they’re regional, it’s usually easier to talk to a person on the phone and get practical advice for getting started on your journey to homeownership.

Look Outside Your Area

If you’ve started your search and all of the suitable homes in your area are out of your price range, you may want to expand your search. The switch to remote work has affected many of us, making cities and other centers of work less reliably desirable. If you’re currently working remotely or have the opportunity to do so in the future, you may be able to expand your search to include larger homes in less urban areas.

Buying in a more urban location like Boise might also get easier with the rise of remote work. Since Boise is such a student-heavy town, classes and work going virtual have opened up real estate in the city. If you’re looking for a good deal on a smaller urban home or condo, this may be a good time to invest.

Leverage Technology by Buying a Home With Homie

Another great way to save money when you’re buying a home in Idaho is to use a service like Homie. Instead of paying a high percentage of the final costs, you’ll pay your Homie agent a low flat fee.

Homie also leverages technology to make the home buying process easier. The Homie family of companies makes everything that much smoother. We’ve brought everything from the mortgage to insurance under one roof, ensuring you don’t have to run all over town to get papers signed and contracts approved. It all happens through Homie.

The best part of working with a Homie agent while buying a house is the refund of up to $2,500 we send you at the end of the process. The Homie team is always here to help buyers in Idaho save money. Get in touch with us today to start your journey towards homeownership.

Get more homebuying tips!

4 Ways to Outsmart the Competition When Buying a Home
5 Tips to Help You Afford Your First Home
Common Home Buying Fears and How To Overcome Them

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The post How to Save Money When You Buy a Home in Idaho appeared first on Homie Blog.

Source: homie.com

Home Decor, Spending Money Wisely

MBANJ Proposes Permanent Work-from-Home Capability for Originators

The Mortgage Bankers Association of New Jersey has announced its proposal to state regulators that would provide for mortgage loan originators to work from home on a permanent basis.
The proposal would permit the originators to work from home and eliminate the need to work within a specified proximity to a licensed branch office. This would effectively eliminate the need for companies to maintain costly licensed branch office locations solely to meet these proximity requirements.

The proposal would ensure the security of a consumer’s information through the required use of company equipment only and by prohibiting MLO’s from having paper records on site. And all conversations and other communications would require complete privacy.

A special designation for virtual MLOs (VMLO) is also being considered. An hour or two of additional CE might be considered to deal with training related to security issues. And the fee charged for the designation could help offset any loss of revenue from branch offices by the states .

This will be a costly effort to pursue across the country and MBANJ is looking for Platinum Members and Corporate Sponsors as well as other new members who would like to help in this effort and to have their voices heard.

Download the full proposal.

Source: themortgageleader.com

Home Decor, Spending Money Wisely

Avoid These 5 Mistakes When Buying a Home Sight Unseen

Buying a home sight unseen might seem like a massive gamble: plunking down hundreds of thousands (maybe millions) of dollars on a property you’ve never set foot in, your fingers crossed it looks just like the photos and doesn’t have major issues! So how lucky do you feel, anyway?

But during the pandemic—when stay-at-home restrictions made touring a property difficult and folks were eager to get out of densely populated cities—greater numbers of buyers than ever before were more game to buy sight unseen.

One of those buyers was Jenny Haiar of Sioux Falls, SD, who recently went through the virtual process of purchasing a new condominium in Scottsdale, AZ. She purchased a one-bedroom, one-bathroom with a view of the mountains.

How have Haiar and other buyers like her successfully bought a home sight unseen? Sure, the process comes with risks and challenges, but, if done right, it’s possible to land a property that checks all your boxes. Just be sure to avoid the following mistakes.

1. Not asking the right questions

Zach Combs at Northrop Realty in Maryland says asking questions is the No. 1 tool in purchasing a home. The simple equation: the more you ask, the more comfortable you will be when it comes time to sign the paperwork—so let the queries fly.

“I ultimately compiled a list of everything I thought of regarding my day-to-day and work-life needs, goals, and expectations,” says Haiar. “This was about eight months of questions and answers to gain a full understanding of the homeowners association, rules, policies, buying process, and more.”

Combs says you can never ask your real estate agent or potential new HOA too many questions, so jot down each and every one.

2. Not hiring the best local agent for the job

A local real estate agent can serve as your eyes and ears when buying a home sight unseen.

Haiar knew exactly what she was looking for, but she didn’t live in Arizona.

“I felt a local agent based in Scottsdale could give me the best overall bird’s-eye view of properties. I never felt pressured to look at anything that didn’t fit my criteria,” says Haiar.

Vet agents by looking at personal testimonies, and don’t be afraid to ask them for a list of references. You can use a real estate site (such as this one!) to uncover more info about how long the agents have been at the job, their sales volume, the areas they specialize in, and client reviews.

3. Not fully using all technology

FaceTime tours, Google Street View, and online property listings are all useful tools you need to take advantage of when buying a house sight unseen.

“Use every bit of technology available for the listings you are interested in,” says Combs. “Not all listing agents or sellers pay for a 3D tour, but if they have one, use it to understand the flow of the house.”

He says at the very least, buyers should always video-chat with their agent to see the house and get a feel of the space.

4. Not demanding a floor plan

While a floor plan may not always be available, it is an important detail buyers should not overlook.

“If you have an open space in your current dwelling, either outside or inside, where you can tape off the actual room sizes, then you can make a mock layout with your furniture. This will help you truly understand if the space really can work for you and your family,” says Combs. 

If a floor plan is unavailable, ask if your agent can measure the rooms and give a crude layout of the space. If an agent can get the measurements, Combs recommends buyers use Floorplanner.com, a free tool that can help you visualize your potential new home.

Understanding the floor plan was crucial for Haiar. When coordinating furniture delivery, she says, it was important to know the items fit in her space.

5. Not getting an appraisal and a home inspection

Giving a home a good walk-through is important with any home purchase, but buying sight unseen means calling in the experts.

“If you are purchasing the home with a loan, your lender will require an appraisal for them to be able to close the loan,” says Combs. “If you’re buying with cash, then it would be up to you.”

But regardless of how you’re financing the purchase, Combs says buyers should get a home inspection when buying sight unseen, “so you know exactly how much work the house needs and if you are comfortable handling those repairs.”

Haiar says it’s also important to have an insurance broker review insurance requirements and your HOA policy and coverage (if applicable).

Source: realtor.com