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This is the Best App to Play Solitaire for Real Money

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Chances are, you’ve played your fair share of Solitaire. And why wouldn’t you? It’s a great time-killer, it’s fun and it’s a nice little mental challenge. The only thing that could make it better? Winning money for it.

The Solitaire Cube app lets you do just that. This free app lets you play the classic card game you already know and love, plus it matches you with players in your skill level, so you can go head-to-head in tournaments where you can win real money. Plus, the games are quick — just two to five minutes each, and you can play them anywhere.

How to Win Real Money Just for Playing Solitaire on Your Phone

You might be thinking this sounds too good to be true. But here’s the thing: It’s really not. One Solitaire Cube player, Amanda, even won about $6,000 and was able to use her winnings to recarpet her house.

“When I actually started winning money and earning prizes, I was blown away,” she says.

Interested? Here’s how it works: Download the free Solitaire Cube app and create an account. Then you can play some free practice matches to get the hang of things. If you don’t already know how to play, it’s easy to learn. Then, when you’re ready, Solitaire Cube will match you with players at your same skill level. Beginners play beginners; experts play other experts. Yep, you won’t get outplayed by some Solitaire grandmaster — you’ll both have the same deck, so winning is all about skill.

The app itself is free to download, but if you want to play for money, you’ll need to deposit some money first. You can deposit as little as $2 to start, using PayPal, credit card or Apple Pay. It’s super easy. Then you can play head-to-head, in large pools and live tournaments — some of these tournaments have paid out prizes as big as $350,000. When it’s time to cash out, there’s no waiting period, like with some other apps. You can get your money almost instantly.

Solitaire Cube has an App Store rating of 4.6 out of 5 from more than 70,000 users’ rankings.

As for Skillz, the platform that hosts the game, it operates hundreds of games and has paid out more than $2 billion in prizes so far. The company has invested years into its player-matching technology, ensuring you only compete with players of the same skill level.

Win or lose, you always receive “ticketz” that you can redeem in Skillz’ Ticketz store for cash or prizes, like Amazon gift cards, a 65-inch TV — even a BMW or a Porsche. The higher stakes you play for, the more ticketz you receive.

For Solitaire players, here’s the most important part: The game is well designed, a classic Solitaire experience. To get started, just download the free app and start playing your first game immediately.

Mike Brassfield (mike@thepennyhoarder.com) is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. He loves him some Solitaire.

Unfortunately, you can’t play for money in the following states: Arkansas, Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Montana, South Carolina, South Dakota or Tennessee. However, in those states, you can still play for fun with the game’s virtual currency.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com

Money Management, Money Tips, Mortgage Rates, Refinance

Mortgage Rates vs. Fed Announcements

Posted on March 3rd, 2020

File this one under “no correlation,” despite a flood of news articles claiming the Fed’s rate cut directly impacts mortgage rates.

Today, the Fed cut the federal funds rate by half a percentage point to a range of 1-1.25% due to the uncertainty surrounding the coronavirus, this despite a strong U.S. economy.

That sent mortgage rates trending and the media into overdrive, searching for possible angles.

You can’t blame them (the media) – it makes for a good headline, but much of what is thrown out there usually isn’t true or anything to worry about.

In most cases, it’s excitement-inducing or fear mongering, or simply something to fill the page.

It tends to be a regurgitated article that comes out around the time the Fed meets, which is every six weeks throughout the year (eight times annually).

Whenever a Fed announcement comes along, you’ll start to see an uptick in articles about what mortgage rates will do when the Fed speaks, with the most common ones being “rates expected to rise” or “rates could move even lower thanks to Fed rate cut.”

Or you’ll get straight up definitive articles warning you about the impending rate rise and what you should/can do to mitigate the damage.

The problem is it’s simply not accurate and these tend to do more harm than good.

The Fed Doesn’t Announce Mortgage Rates

  • The Fed doesn’t set or announce consumer mortgage rates
  • Regardless of the misinformation you’ll find out there
  • When they announce a Fed rate change
  • Mortgage rates may go up or down (or do nothing!)

When the Fed gets together to set the target rate for the Federal Funds Rate, financial markets (stocks, bonds, etc.) pay attention and react.

As does the media because it’s generally a big deal. But Jerome Powell and co. don’t sit down and decide which way mortgage rates will go.

Rather, they discuss the state of the broader economy, inflation, monetary policy, and so on.

They almost never mention mortgages explicitly, except for in recent years thanks to the remnants of the quantitative easing program known as QE3.

No Correlation Between Fed Funds Rate and Mortgage Rates

fed funds vs mortgage rates

Additionally, there’s no clear correlation between the Federal Funds Rate and mortgages.

In other words, one can go up while the other goes down. Or one can do nothing while the other does something. Or they can move in the same direction for a while.

But the spread between the two won’t remain in a certain range over time like mortgage rates and the 10-year bond yield do.

You can’t say the 30-year fixed should be X% higher or lower than the Fed Funds Rate at any given time.

As you can see from the St. Louis Fed chart above, the 10-year yield and the 30-year fixed (based on Freddie Mac data) move in relative lockstep.

You can see the blue line and red line move in a very similar fashion over the years with a pretty steady spread. Then there’s the green line (Fed Funds Rate), which is all over the place.

Sometimes you see a long-term trend, but other times you see no apparent correlation.

Check out the second graph below, from 2000-2010, which shows some similar movement between the FFF and mortgage rates, but at times no obvious relationship.

decade compare

In short, mortgage rates don’t necessarily follow the Fed, whether that’s up, down, or nowhere at all.

The Fed Indirectly Influences Mortgage Rates

  • A more accurate way of defining the relationship
  • Is that it might be an indirect, long-term one
  • If the Fed is raising rates over time
  • Long-term mortgage rates may eventually follow

Some may argue that the Fed indirectly influences mortgage rates. Really, the Fed is just trying to control inflation via short-term rates. This in turn dictates how longer-term rates may play out.

Essentially, the market for longer-term rates such as 30-year mortgages (and mortgage-backed securities) might seek direction from Fed cues.

The Fed tends to telegraph its moves well in advance, so it’s pretty rare for anyone to get too surprised the day they release their FOMC statement.

Today was a little different since it was an “emergency rate cut,” but it still wasn’t totally unexpected. Again, the Fed is pretty conservative.

Anyway, they do give an indication as to which way we’re (the economy is) headed and what kind of monetary policy is in store, which can be important to longer-term rates, such as 30-year fixed mortgages.

That means the Fed statement can have an immediate impact on mortgage rates on the day it’s released, to the point where lenders may need to reprice ratesheets from morning to afternoon.

But that reprice can completely counter the Fed’s move. For example, the Fed can lower its key rate while mortgage lenders reprice rates higher. Or do absolutely nothing.

Mortgage Rates Can Go Either Way…

  • Pay attention to Fed announcements when they’re released
  • But don’t give them too much weight or worry about them
  • Or think you can predict what will happen to mortgage rates
  • Since there’s no clear short-term correlation

So, Fed announcements can affect mortgage rates, but how they’ll affect mortgage rates is mostly a crapshoot.

You can’t say oh, the Fed lowered rates so my 30-year mortgage will be lower too. And you can’t say oh no, the Fed raised rates, I should have locked my mortgage!

The mortgage rate trend lately has without a doubt been lower, but we’ve reached a point where rates are at/near all-time lows, making it increasingly difficult for them to get any better.

Ultimately, lenders don’t even have the capacity (staff, etc.) or the desire to lower rates because they’re probably already swamped.

Then there are the MBS investors to worry about, who won’t be thrilled about all the prepayments happening.

In summary, it can be a mystery as to how things will go post Fed statement, and you can always get hung out to dry. That’s why floating a mortgage rate isn’t for the faint of heart.

But again, the Fed’s move may have no bearing on your mortgage rate, at least not today, or tomorrow. Or even next week.

The Fed might just be good at telling us which direction mortgage rates are headed (eventually) based on policy and broader economic conditions.

If you’re wondering why mortgage rates haven’t improved after the announcement today, perhaps it was already baked in. And as noted, it’s getting really hard to move even lower.

I don’t know if lenders want to give you a 2% 30-year fixed.

You could argue that mortgage lenders were ahead of the Fed on this one, with rates marching lower for weeks on end lately.

Just remember this; lenders will use any excuse to raise mortgage rates, but take their sweet old time lowering them.

That means we could even see more improvement in coming days and weeks, but not because of the Fed. More so due to economic unknowns globally.

Tip: The only direct mortgage impact you’ll see from a Fed announcement is an increase or decrease in the prime rate, which affects the pricing of HELOCs, among other consumer loans. Everything else is indirect and not necessarily correlated.

(photo: Federalreserve)

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

Money Tips, Mortgage Rates, Mortgage Tips, Moving Guide, Refinance

Watch Out for Low Mortgage Rates You Have to Pay For

Posted on November 4th, 2020

Mortgage rates keep on marching lower and lower, with new records broken seemingly every week.

But with all the fervor surrounding mortgage rates, some lenders are playing the “how low can we appear to go” game.

For example, mortgage lenders may be talking about their lowest rates (with multiple points required), as opposed to offering their par rates, the latter coming at no extra cost to the consumer.

So instead of being presented with a mortgage rate of say 2.75% on a 30-year fixed, you may see a rate as low as 1.99%. Or even a 15-year fixed at 1.75%!

Here’s the problem; with mortgage rates breaking record lows time and time again, 10+ times so far in 2020, many homeowners are finding the need to refinance the mortgage twice. Or even three times.

And those who chose to pay points at closing, only to refinance within months or a year, essentially left money on the table.

Or they decide not to refinance to an even lower rate, knowing they’ll lose that upfront cost that’s already been paid, which is also a tough situation.

Mortgage Rates Aren’t as Low as They Appear

  • In order to advertise lower mortgage rates lower than the competition
  • Lenders will often tack on discount points to their publicized rates
  • Meaning you’ll have to pay a certain amount upfront to obtain the low rate in question
  • Make sure you’re actually comparing apples to apple when mortgage rate shopping

Guess what? That absurdly low mortgage rate you saw advertised isn’t really as low as it seems.

Typically, when you see a rate that’s beating the pants off the national average, and all other lenders, mortgage points must be paid.

And when the rate is really, really low, it usually means multiple mortgage points must be paid.

In other words, you wind up paying a substantial amount of money, known as prepaid interest, to secure an ultra low, below-market interest rate.

Assuming your loan amount is $200,000, two points to obtain a rate of 1.99% on a 30-year fixed would set you back $4,000.

If the loan amount were $400,000, we’re talking $8,000 upfront to secure that super awesome low rate.

Tip: Watch out for lenders and mortgage brokers who quote you a low mortgage rate, but neglect to tell you that you must pay a point (or two) upfront to obtain it.

Often, this tactic is employed to snag your business, and once you’re committed, the truth comes out, which is why mortgage APR is so important.

Is Paying for an Even Lower Mortgage Rate Right Now the Smart Move?

  • When mortgage rates are already really low (record lows at the moment)
  • It becomes somewhat less attractive to pay points at closing
  • It could be pretty expensive to get just a slightly lower rate that will save you very little
  • And your money might be better served elsewhere, especially if inflation worsens

Here’s the thing. Mortgage rates are already so low that paying mortgage discount points to go even lower isn’t all that attractive.

There’s a great chance mortgage rates will surge higher in the future as inflation finally rears its ugly head. And at that point, you’ll already have an insanely low interest rate.

On top of that, you’ll be able to invest your liquid assets in other high-yielding accounts, likely something pretty darn safe with a rate of return that will beat your low mortgage rate.

So why keep going lower and lower if you’re already paying next to nothing on your home loan?

Additionally, you won’t want to spread yourself too thin, especially if you’re buying a new house.

There are a ton of costs associated with a new home purchase, so committing all your liquidity to an even lower rate could mean that you won’t have money for relocation costs, furnishings, necessary repairs, or an upgrade.

And as mentioned, mortgage rates do have the potential to move even lower than current levels, meaning it could make sense to refinance again, favoring those who didn’t pay much to anything at closing.

Or better yet, just went with a no cost refinance to avoid paying anything to the bank or lender.

As always, do the math to see what makes sense for you. If you’re super serious about paying off your mortgage early, then buying down your rate could be the right move.

It will certainly vary based on your unique financial situation, the loan amount, the cost to buy down the rate, and how long you plan to stay with the loan/home.

Certainly take the time to compare mortgage rates with and without points, but don’t just chase a low rate below an emotional threshold, like 2%.

And determine how long it’ll take to pay back any points at closing with regular monthly mortgage payments.

Personally, locking in a 30-year fixed rate below 3% seems like a tremendous bargain.

Investing the money elsewhere, such as in stocks or bonds or wherever else, could end up being a lot more rewarding than paying prepaid interest at closing.

Perhaps more importantly, you’ll have access to that money if and when necessary for more pressing matters.

Lastly, you can always pay extra each month if and when you choose to reduce your principal balance and total interest paid. So that’s always an option regardless of the rate you wind up with.

Read more: Are mortgage points worth the cost?

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

Money Management, Money Tips, Mortgage News, Mortgage Rates, Refinance

Don’t Freak Out About the Recent Mortgage Rate ‘Spike’

Posted on January 15th, 2021

Queue the panic. Mortgage rates have officially spiked and the media is all over it.

Yep, the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage increased from 2.65% to 2.79% this week, per Freddie Mac’s weekly survey.

Freddie Mac Chief Economist Sam Khater noted in the weekly news release that mortgage rates have been under pressure as Treasury yields have risen.

But he did stress that “while mortgage rates are expected to increase modestly in 2021, they will remain inarguably low.”

So he’s not panicking, even though the Washington Post and other news outlets are leading with articles about “mortgage rates spiking.”

When it comes down to it, a 14-basis point move isn’t what I’d refer to as a “spike,” but yes, mortgage rates are higher than they were last week.

But they are still well below the 3.65% average seen at this time a year ago.

Why Have Mortgage Rates Increased Lately?

rates

  • 30-year fixed mortgage rates have fallen to and hovered close to record lows for months
  • It’s inevitable to see some upward pressure after such a long period of record-breaking movement
  • One driver could be the bond selloff, which lower prices and increases yields
  • This might relate to the Democrats winning the Senate and increasing stimulus spending

As noted, mortgage rates are no longer at record lows, and are in fact closer to 3% than 2%. So should we all freak out?

I’m going to go with no. While the media is using the word “spike” in their articles, perhaps to make its relatively boring weekly report a little more interesting, things aren’t that bad.

Remember, mortgage rates are only marginally higher, and probably not high enough to change anyone’s position on buying a home or refinancing their mortgage.

Sure, there’s a chance someone’s monthly mortgage payment now exceeds the max DTI allowed for the loan, but if you were cutting it that close, you’re probably buying too much home.

As to what’s causing the recent upward reversal, mortgage rate watcher Matthew Graham seems to think it relates to the bond sell-off as a result of the Democrats taking over the Senate.

Simply put, the government issues Treasuries to fund additional COVID-related stimulus, which while good for the economy and struggling households, increases bond supply.

The result is lower bond prices, which forces the accompanying yields (or interest rates) higher.

And because Treasuries correlate with long-term mortgage rates like the 30-year fixed, borrowers will pay more to finance their homes.

Is This the End of Low Mortgage Rates Forever?

  • Let us remember that mortgage rates started off 2021 at all-time record lows
  • So it’s not surprising for them to rise off those levels if there’s any pressure whatsoever
  • I fully expect mortgage rates to hit new lows at some point this year
  • But you’re always going to see ebbs and flows over the course of 365 days

While it’s easy to let your fears and emotions get the best of you, perhaps we shouldn’t call an end to the low-rate party just yet.

Ultimately, mortgage rates ebb and flow, similar to how stocks go up and down from day to day, or week to week.

Yes, it’s easy to get caught up in the psychology of it all and panic, but I just don’t believe we’ve seen the end of the low rates.

Additionally, there may even be more record lows in store for 2021.

Remember, the first week of 2021 resulted in new all-time lows for both the 30-year fixed and 15-year fixed, so it’s kind of far-fetched to sound the alarm.

This isn’t to say we don’t experience a period of relatively higher rates, it’s just that it could be short-lived.

Remember, the presidential inauguration is next week and there are thousands of National Guard protecting the Mall in Wasington D.C and holed up in the Capitol Building.

If that gives you confidence that good times are ahead, well, I don’t know what to tell you.

Not trying to be an alarmist, but there’s just too much uncertainty in the air for interest rates to flourish.

In short, bad news tends to lower rates, while good news increases them. I don’t see much good news, even with all that proposed government spending taken into account.

A month ago, the Federal Reserve said it would be keep its short-term interest rate near zero for the foreseeable future as the economy attempts to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

They also indicated that they’d continue to buy Treasuries and mortgage-backed securities (MBS) at the current pace until “substantial progress” is seen in the economy.

Call me a pessimist, but I don’t see anything positive happening with the economy this year, or even next year.

I think we’ve all been ignoring the elephant in the room while watching the stock market reach new all-time highs. At some point, reality will hit.

Ultimately, as long as they’re continuing to buy the mortgages this month and next, lenders will continue to make them at low, low rates.

Time will tell if rates will need to rise on long-term fixed mortgages as the Fed eventually exits the marketplace.

Is It Best to Lock Now or Wait?

  • Times like this exemplify the importance of locking in your mortgage rate
  • You are typically given the choice to lock or float your interest rate once you apply for a home loan
  • If you like what you see, lock it in and don’t give it another thought
  • If mortgage rates shoot up quickly, it could be wise to float and wait for things to calm down

My guess is fixed-rate mortgages will settle down and begin making their way back to lows seen earlier this month.

Of course, mortgage lenders are always quick to raise rates, and a lot more patient when it comes to lowering them (at our expense).

You can’t blame them though – they don’t want to get caught out if volatile rates change direction and they’re on the wrong end of that.

Times like these really exemplify the importance of locking in your mortgage rate. No one cares or complains until rates increase.

If you’re happy with your quoted rate, lock it in and forget about it.

If you’ve got some time before funding, maybe float a bit and wait for some improvement.

After all, the more time you have, the more chances you’ve got for rates to move lower.

And you can always lean on your loan officer or mortgage broker if you’re not sure what to do. Most of the experienced ones keep a keen eye on rates.

In summary, you don’t need to panic, but you should be aware of the fluid situation if you’re looking to refinance or buy a home in 2021.

It might also be a good time to consider how long you plan to stay in your home as well.

That could dictate your mortgage decision and whether or not to pay mortgage points for an even lower rate.

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

Home Decor, Mortgage, Refinance, Unique Homes

5 Rampant Mortgage Myths You’ll Hear These Days—Completely Debunked

These days, things are changing so fast, it’s tough to keep up. That’s especially true in the mortgage industry, where interest rates and the overall home loan landscape are shifting with such head-spinning speed, it’s easy for outdated information to circulate, leading home buyers and homeowners astray.

You may have heard, for instance, that everyone can score a record-low interest rate, or that refinancing is a no-brainer, or that mortgage forbearance means you don’t have to pay back your loan, ever. Sorry, but none of these rumors is true—and falling for them could cost you dearly.

To help home buyers and homeowners separate fact from fiction, we asked experts to highlight some rampant mortgage mistruths out there today. Whether you’re looking to buy or refinance, these are some reality checks you’ll be glad to know.

Myth No. 1: Everyone qualifies for low interest rates

There’s a lot of buzz about record-low mortgage interest rates lately. Most recently, a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage dropped to 2.88% for the week of Aug. 6, according to Freddie Mac.

This is great news for borrowers, but here’s the rub: “Not everyone will qualify for the lowest rates,” explains Danielle Hale, chief economist at realtor.com®.

So who stands to get the best rates? Namely, borrowers with a good credit score, Hale says. Most lenders require a minimum credit score of about 620. Some lenders might require an even higher threshold (more on that later).

Your credit score isn’t the only factor affecting what interest rate you get. It also depends on the size of your down payment, type of home, type of loan, and much more. So, keep your expectations in check, and make sure to shop around to increase the odds you’ll get a good rate.

Myth No. 2: Getting a mortgage today is easy

Many assume today’s low interest rates mean that getting a mortgage will be a breeze. On the contrary, these low rates mean just about everyone is trying to get a mortgage, or refinance the one they have. This glut of applicants, combined with the uncertain economy, means some lenders may actually tighten loan requirements.

In fact, a realtor.com analysis found that 5% to 20% of potential borrowers may struggle to get a mortgage because of these stricter standards. And getting a mortgage could become even tougher if the recession gets worse.

For example, some lenders may also require higher minimum credit scores and larger down payments. In April, JPMorgan Chase began requiring a 700 minimum credit score and 20% down payment.

Jason Lee, executive vice president and director of capital markets at Flagstar Bank, says some lenders aren’t offering the loans that are considered riskier—such as jumbo loans, which exceed the conforming loan limit (for 2020, that max is $510,400).

“There aren’t as many loan products available,” Lee says.

And even if you do manage to get a loan, it may take longer than you’d typically expect.

“Based on low rates and a high volume of refinances, loans are taking longer to complete from application to closing,” says Staci Titsworth, a regional mortgage manager for PNC Bank.

As such, borrowers should ask their lender how long the process will take to close, and make sure they’re aware of the expiration date on the interest rate they’ve locked in—since with rates this low, they could go up.

“Most lenders are locking in the customer’s interest rate so it’s protected from market fluctuations,” Titsworth adds.

Myth No. 3: Everyone should refinance their mortgage

“With mortgage rates hovering near record lows, a refinance can make sense and can help free up monthly cash flow,” Hale says.

Still, not everyone should refinance. Homeowners should make sure to take a good hard look at their situation to see whether it makes sense for them.

For one, it will depend on your current interest rate. If it’s low already, it may not be worth the trouble—particularly since refinancing comes with fees amounting to around 2% to 6% of your loan amount.

Given these upfront costs, refinancing often makes sense only if you plan to remain in your house for a while.

In general, “refinancing is a good idea for homeowners who plan to live in the same home for several years, because they will reap the monthly savings over a longer time period,” Hale explains.

Myth No. 4: You can apply for a mortgage after you’ve found a home

Many people assume that you can find your dream home first, then apply for the mortgage. But that’s backward—now more than ever. Today, your first stop when shopping for a house should be a mortgage lender or broker, who can get you pre-approved for a home loan.

For “a buyer in a competitive market, it’s typically essential to have pre-approval done in order to submit an offer, so getting it done before you even look at homes is a smart move that will enable a buyer to move fast to put an offer in on the right home,” Hale says.

Mortgage pre-approval is all the more essential in the era of the coronavirus pandemic. Why? Because many home sellers, leery of letting just anyone tour their home, want to know a buyer is serious—and has the cash and financing to make a firm offer. As such, some real estate agents and sellers require a pre-approval letter before a potential buyer can view a home in person.

Nonetheless, according to a realtor.com survey conducted in June of over 2,000 active home shoppers who plan to purchase a home in the next 12 months, only 52% obtained a pre-approval letter before beginning their home search, which means nearly half of home buyers are missing this crucial piece of paperwork.

Aside from getting their foot in the door of homes they want to see, home buyers benefit from pre-approval in other ways. Since pre-approval lets you know exactly how much money a lender will loan you, it also helps you target the right homes within your budget.

After all, as Lee points out, “You don’t want to get your heart set on a home only to find out you can’t afford it.”

Myth No. 5: Mortgage forbearance means you don’t have to pay back your loan

The record unemployment caused by the COVID-19 pandemic means millions of Americans have struggled to pay their mortgages. To get some relief, many have been granted mortgage forbearance.

Nearly 8% of mortgages, or 3.8 million homeowners, were in forbearance as of July 26, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association.

The problem? Many mistakenly assume that mortgage forbearance means you won’t have to pay your loan, period. But forbearance means different things for different homeowners, depending on the terms of the mortgage and what type of arrangement was worked out with the lender.

“Forbearance is not forgiveness,” Lee says. “Rather, it’s a timeout from having to make a mortgage payment where your servicer—the company you send your mortgage payments to—will ensure that negative impacts to your credit report and late fees will not occur. However, because forbearance is not forgiveness, you will need to reach some sort of resolution with your loan servicer about the missed payments.”

The paused payments may be added to the back end of the loan or repaid over time.

“It does not forgive the payments, meaning the borrower still owes the money,” Hale says. “The specifics of when payments need to be made up will vary from borrower to borrower.”

For more smart financial news and advice, head over to MarketWatch.

Source: realtor.com