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Mortgage Refinance
Mortgage Refinance

750: Recruit and Retain Your Market’s Top Real Estate Agents with Rick Cantore

Has recruiting and retaining high-quality agents been an ongoing struggle? If so, you won’t want to miss this podcast with RE/MAX Advantage Realty’s COO, Rick Cantore. Not only is Rick responsible for overseeing RE/MAX’s recruiting efforts, he works relentlessly to retain their top agents. On today’s show, Rick shares the tools and strategies he personally employs to recruit his market’s best agents and to retain valuable team members. Listen and learn exactly what it takes to add promising agents to your team and keep them as they grow.

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Mortgage Refinance

Thankful Investor – John Martinez

 

Hey, welcome back for another segment! This is the 3rd and final segment that I wanted to share with you from my recent live event called the Thankful Real Estate Investor. We hosted this live right before Thanksgiving and it was an interactive event. Our 3rd speaker is Mr. John Martinez, the top real estate investor sales trainer! Let’s get started!

If you’re not a member of the FlipNerd Private Facebook group yet, you can join here: www.flipnerd.com/pro-event, and get access to lots of upcoming live and interactive content like this going forward.

Resources and Links from this show:

  • Investor Fuel Real Estate Mastermind
  • FlipNerd Professional Real Estate Investor Network: Join for Free!
  • Investor Machine Real Estate Lead Generation

Listen to the Audio Version of this Episode

FlipNerd Show Transcript:

[00:00:00] Mike: [00:00:00] Professional real estate investors are a different breed. We’re not afraid to go all in and take educated risks to build stronger businesses and help our families live better lives.

This is the FlipNerd professional real estate investor show. And I’m your host Mike Hambright each week. I host a new episode live and bring you America’s top real estate investors as guests.

Let’s start today’s show. Hey everybody. Welcome back for another segment. This is the. The third segment of three that I wanted to share with you from my recent live events called the thankful real estate investor. We hosted this live right before Thanksgiving. It was an interactive segment. So, uh, hopefully if you weren’t there, you’ll join us on an upcoming events.

Uh, our third speaker is mr. John Martinez, by the way, I’d love for you to join us at our future live events. We’re going to be doing these several times a month, going forward events like this that are live and interactive, answering your questions in our private. FlipNerd Facebook group. The way you [00:01:00] get access to that group is you go to flipnerd.com/pro event has a hyphen there pro dash event flipnerd.com/pro-event.

Make sure you go there and register. We’ll get you in the group and you can join us if you didn’t this time on our next live and interactive, uh, event. Let’s go ahead and jump in with mr. John Martinez.

I’m going to bring my buddy John Martinez and. John, how are you? You’re a little bit cut off. I think.

John: [00:01:27] Let me adjust the camera here.

Mike: [00:01:30] We want to see your good side.

John: [00:01:34] So you have to just deal with it.

Mike: [00:01:37] Yeah. So how are you? My friend.

John: [00:01:38] I’m good. I’m good. How are you  doing? How are you doing Mike?

Mike: [00:01:41] Good. Good. So as we’re kind of getting started here, I’ll ask a really a couple of things. First is if you guys have questions for John, if you don’t know John.

That’d be kind of unusual. So if you know, John is, and you want to ask some questions about what’s working now from a sales technique standpoint, or an approach of how you handle your leads, start to chat those in I’d love to get to your [00:02:00] questions. In the meantime, John, while we’re waiting on some questions, maybe you can share a little bit about what you’re most thankful about.

We’ve got so much to be thankful for. What would you share that, uh, I know you probably have, might have a long list if we had time to talk about it, but what are one of the things that come to mind that you’re most thankful for?

Uh, my health, uh, man, I turned 40 this year. So it’s funny how I that’s like more and more of a top of mine topic.

Like, uh, every year you get older. So, uh, turning 40 every day. I’m thankful for my health. Uh, thankful for parts of me that don’t hurt when I was picked up. And then, I mean the same with my family. Yeah, me too. My kids and my wife are all healthy. And I think, um, as long as you have that, you can basically basically get through anything else.

So that’s gotta be what I’m most grateful for.

Awesome. Awesome. Well, that’s great. So, so John, while we’re kind of waiting on some more questions, or maybe you could kind of share a little bit about what’s what’s working now, like we’ve been through, I wish we were through the COVID, so I don’t know if we’re through it earlier.

Trevor said we’re kind of. In the middle of this [00:03:00] code. And I’m like, hopefully we’re at the tail end. I don’t know where we’re at, but it’s, it’s changed. The dynamic has a lot of people that are doing stuff virtually now, or certainly vetting more out on the phone than they used to. What are, what are some of the things that are, that are kind of working now that people have had to adapt to over the last six or eight months?

Yeah. So it’s, you know, in sales, what’s worked for forever was having a plan or we call sales process. But I think it’s more important now than ever because we’re not doing as much kind of face to face or belly to belly selling. Um, so a lot of people who could kind of get away with just their wit and their good looks inside of a house and really building rapport that way and going buddy, buddy, and, um, having really good conversations because of, of that ability.

It’s it’s a lot harder to do that on the phone. So you have to start to rely on your plan or your sales process. I think even more now than ever before. Right? Your plan about what I want to accomplish during this call, how do I want it to begin? What do I want to, uh, [00:04:00] what’s the agenda for the middle? How do I want this thing to end?

What will, what will the acceptable outcomes be? Um, you know, if I run up against hidden decision makers, influencers, Pushback resistance. How am I going to deal with that? So I think it’s always, you know, the cornerstone of any good sales organization or sales person is, is process or having a plan. But I just think it’s more important right now than it’s ever been since we’re so disconnected.

Yep. Yep. So we’ve got a question from Matt here. That’s talking about kind of, how are you negotiate remotely? And I think, you know, a lot, like we just talked about a lot of people who have transitioned to doing this over the phone. And you lose some things on the phone, right? You don’t get to see the facial expressions or exactly how they’re living.

You don’t really get any indication of what the house is like by just walking in the front door. Um, maybe, can you maybe share some tips on how to make that transition for those that have had to make that transition that we’re buying at the kitchen table, if you will, to doing more over the phone?

John: [00:04:57] Yeah, I, I can’t so great point.

So usually in [00:05:00] a negotiation, you know, by the time you get there, A negotiation. You’ve got to walk a pretty tight line because you want to negotiate aggressively to get yourself the best deal. But at the same time, you don’t want to put yourself in a position where you, you upset someone or offend them in such a way that you kill your own deal.

Now, when you’re face to face, you can basically just read it. Right. Do you know the body language, the tonality? Um, no one can really hang up on you when they’re face-to-face either. Quit and say, get out of my house now they can, but it’s harder. Right? So in order to do that over the phone, one best practice I found what’s working right now is always assume the worst during the negotiation.

And then I’ll tell you what I mean by that. Um, you’re always safe if you assume the worst, um, uh, in a, in a sales negotiation and when it comes to keeping the conversation going and not offending someone or, or losing rapport. So here’s what I mean by that. Um, if you’re, if you’re making offers, you know, always assume that they’re not going to take it.

So here’s, here’s some examples, [00:06:00] uh, listen, I’d love to offer you a 75,000 for the property, but you know, based on this phone call, I’m guessing that if I offered that and I’m way out of the ballpark. Um, so, so you tell me, am I, am I, am I right? Am I in my way out of there? So just always assuming the worst there, you won’t put your prospect or the seller back on their heels and, and start that kind of confrontational negotiation.

So even as you go through the negotiation and you’re going back and forth, you know, Hey, I think I could offer you more money, but that would require you to, um, help it to clean out a little bit, or certainly shorten the timeframe or commit, uh, you know, within the next 48 hours. And, you know, we haven’t had a chance to think about that.

So I’m not sure if that, you know, the more, the extra money would even be worth, you know, you. Cleaning out a little bit more or painting the living room or getting their old car out of the garage. So I think, um, in order to be safe with negotiations, just err, on the side of caution and what it’ll actually do is it’ll build a, and it’s more amount of rapport.

It’ll [00:07:00] keep the conversation going. It’ll keep you out of that kind of enemy, confrontational battling type of negotiation and extend the conversation. So you can actually get through the negotiation and not end it prematurely.

Mike: [00:07:11] Yep. Good, good. That’s good stuff. So we’ve got another question here. I’m going to, I can’t tell with who the user is, but they’re saying what’s the best way to start a renegotiation or price with sellers.

So I don’t know the context of that, but let’s just say when people are buying virtually more frequently, now that they are, you’re making assumptions on repairs and stuff. And sometimes, you know, you find out that, you know, you told me the kitchen was remodeled, but it turns out is remodeled 20 years ago.

Right. And, uh, that it’s going to cost more. And so I think we all. You know, some people have an approach and I know John believes the same way that I do. You really want to use renegotiate as, as a. As a last defense, like you just really miss something and not this approach of like, well, I’m gonna try to lock it up and then go back and renegotiate.

I think we’re in agreement with how we, how we believe that. Um, but let’s just say we made [00:08:00] our best effort. We put an offer forward, an offer that we thought was good and later we found out we totally missed something or were misled on something. Cause we did it over the phone and we have to renegotiate.

So maybe talk about how to best start to renegotiate a deal with it. Somebody after they’ve agreed to something else.

John: [00:08:17] Yeah. So good question. So it pops up all the time. Um, it just happens. It’s the nature of the business is real estate and buying houses that are in disrepair or, or distressed sellers. Um, it’s going to happen.

So when you do it, you just need to really put yourself in the seller’s shoes when you go into that conversation. So here’s what I mean. We already know. And if you got one with a renegotiation and you’ve agreed to applies, and it might’ve been a tight negotiation to get to the price you originally agreed on.

When you go in and say the deal’s off, or I need even less, you have to understand how they’re going to feel. They’re going to be a little bit shocked. Um, they’re going to probably be a little upset and disappointed. And so as you go into the negotiation, first and foremost, you have to [00:09:00] realize what that will do.

If it’s with a seller it’s going to, they’re going to react the same way as is Mike, or I would react if we got upset or maybe even, you know, in that situation, you might even feel like you’re taking advantage of, or someone trying to pull one over on ya. Um, so you’ve got to realize that that’s going to be met with some type of resistance.

And now resistance in sales really shows itself in two ways. It’s either it’s kind of a fight or flight, right? If you get upset or you feel like you’re being taken advantage of, you’re either going to just shut it down and say fine, it’s off whatever. And I’m sure people have experienced that, right. They go in with the renegotiation and they just say, well, deal’s off.

No. Uh, or if there’s going to be a tremendous amount of pushback aggression, right. Um, get into a, uh, you know, a yelling confrontation or something like that. And that neither of those is going to lead to a smooth negotiation. I think we can agree on that. Right. If they’re shutting it down or, or getting pretty aggressive.

That’s not where you want to start off. So first and foremost, you got to know where your prospect’s mind is going to [00:10:00] be an address mindset first, before you get into the nego renegotiation. So knowing they’re upset, I’m just going to be open and honest and say, listen, I’ve got some bad news. I’m really reluctant to even bring it to you.

I feel like a schmuck because I know I’m going to rain on your parade today. Um, but I’ve, I’ve exhausted every option looking into this, and then we’ve got to have a really tough conversation and I want to let you know, I apologize up front because, um, it’s not going to be a fun one. Right. Uh, so if you see what I saw there, I just, I called the situation what it was.

Um, I took the temperature down using what we call tactical empathy in our sales training. Bye I’m going not okay. Just kind of, you know, going down and, and feeling bad cause you’re about to give bad news and that’s what a normal human being would do. Right. Um, and there’s some science behind it, but anyways, that’s it.

You want to go into it smoothly. And then, uh, I’m going to borrow from the last tip I gave, um, about negotiating over the phone. We want to, we want to come at it from a position where we’re [00:11:00] assuming the worst. So when I renegotiate, I started out just like I said, on the call, and then I’d say, listen, I, there’s no way I can pay 110 grand for the house.

It’s just based on what we found and everything going on. I, I can’t do it and I feel horrible about it, but I assume that if I had to pay even a dollar less, you don’t want to do it. And then just be quiet. Now, the reason why I didn’t say the number that I actually need is we feel tested this quite a bit.

And we found that we just say, you probably don’t want to sell at this point, or I’m not even sure I could buy at this point. Oftentimes sellers renegotiate down lower than, than what you need. Uh, I, I have countless emails and messages from people who said, I need a 10 K off. I went in with that exact read negotiating strategy.

And they said, well, would you take it if I took 20 K off? Right. And then, okay. Uh, so, so that’s it just know their mindsets slide into it, knowing you’re going to upset them and addressing and being real about it. And, and if it doesn’t [00:12:00] feel good to give bad news and don’t hide it, um, and then kind of go negative and assume that.

They’re not going to consider it or not like it, or you might not be able to get the deal done and then just go silent

Mike: [00:12:11] and see what happens. Yep. Yep. And I think some of it too is if you’re, if you shifted your model to bind more virtually, is there some things you can do to pre-frame that upfront? Like here’s our offer.

If part of your processes, we’re going to have an inspector come out and look what I want to try to give you a price. Now you can kind of pre-frame frame that is, uh, like we’re based on what you’ve told me. You know, here’s what we’ve come up with for repairs. And we’re going to have somebody come out and double check this.

And so you can kind of slip in there that in the event that any of that, that I missed anything here, we’ll find out and I’ll let you know, or right. You can kind of pre-frame them.

John: [00:12:44] Absolutely. Um, you know, that, that was kind of the assumption I was running with. No one likes surprises, prizes, especially bad news surprises.

So covering that upfront is definitely a best practice.

Mike: [00:12:56] Yeah. Good. We got a question here from our buddy John Harker, who [00:13:00] says hello?

John: [00:13:00] Hey John,

Mike: [00:13:01] uh, what do you do when a seller just won’t give you a price and just keeps. Saying look online. I don’t know what he means by that. Like,

John: [00:13:10] yeah. Maybe he’s, he’s referring to Zilla or do your research.

Mike: [00:13:13] They’re kind of celebrates online. They just won’t give you a price. And uh, so talk a little bit about what do you do when they just won’t show you their cards and they’re just waiting for you to give an offer.

John: [00:13:23] Yeah. So there’s a lot of strategies to get the number, but I want to come at this question two different ways.

Um, the first way is, okay, how do we get the number again? You’re probably seeing a pattern here. We’re going to pull back a little bit. Um, there there’s two ways to get it. One is I usually just suggest they don’t know the number cause people like to argue and push back. So one way to ask is. Listen, I’m guessing you don’t even know what you’d even what you’d want for the house we contacted.

You probably haven’t had time to do research, to think about it. That’s one way, another way to do it is to ask about a similar property. Oftentimes people don’t want to talk about themselves, but they’ll talk about their neighbors or a member of house in the [00:14:00] neighborhood. So another way you can ask is, Hey, listen, um, Houses in this neighborhood.

Do you know any that have sold recently? What are they going for? Right. And when you have a hundred K 200, 300 and you can kind of whittle it down from there real simply like really were you expecting to get more or less for yours? And now we’re starting to bracket them in and kind of drilling down on.

I was actually expecting a bit more. Well, why is that? Well, it’s a bigger house. It’s a nicer condition we rehab. So you can start to get to it in that round about way now, now that I gave the two ways that you’ll have more success doing it than just asking straight out, um, kind of some caution I want to throw out there.

Um, Oftentimes, unless you’re qualifying, let’s say this makes sense. If you’re qualifying, let’s say you have a bunch of leads and you want to find that, who am I going to work with? Who am I going to send my acquisitions out to? Who am I going to talk to? Where am I going to spend my time? Then you might be asking that price.

You, it’s a, it’s a level of your qualification. Now, if it’s not a level of your qualification, I’ll want to [00:15:00] caution you on asking what their expectations are, because it actually does more harm than it does. Good. Number one, it could get into your head. Um, I’ve worked with plenty of sales reps. Who’ve gone into sales calls gone.

We’re at two 50 for this house. They want 500 why even go, right? And they’re talking themselves out about, out of even showing up. But then when we show up and we run through the sales process and uncover some things, and sometimes those people actually sell for what they need to, right? No, one’s going to.

Call you up and you say, Hey, what would you like to sell for? And they’d say, Oh, 50% of what I think I could sell it for. That’s insane. Right? So sometimes that can kind of get in your head and stop you from even taking the appointment or really going full force at the appointment. The other negative.

About getting their offer is they’re setting expectations. And whenever you come in under it, cause you will come in under whatever they expect, 99 or 999 out of a thousand times. They’re going to be disappointed. [00:16:00] So, because I don’t want to disappoint them. I want to set expectations. I want to come in instead of saying, what would you like?

I’d like a hundred and me saying, I could give you 50 that’s bad. I’d rather go in and say, I’d love to give you 40, but with this, I think if we did it quickly, I could do 50. So then I’m setting, setting expectations. And then, uh, my comparison, it actually sounds a little sweeter. Um, so, so that’s my take on it.

So be careful asking, asking for asking price only do it. If you need it. Because of mindset and the expectations that sets, and then kind of the psychology that goes along with what’s called price anchoring. It could actually have a negative effect. So if you don’t need that information, you might not want to get it.

Mike: [00:16:36] Yep. Good stuff. Good stuff. So, John, we’ve got a really long question. I don’t want to put up on the screen cause I think it’ll block the whole screen, but effectively says, uh, you know, what kind of techniques are working well with speaking to homeowners or landlords? There’s a lot of trouble landlords out there these days because of all the rents, deferments and all this stuff, um, about.

COVID w on the value of their property versus kind of the future. So I think that there’s a couple of ways [00:17:00] I could translate that. I think, um, you know, there’s a, there’s probably a lot more landlords that are hurting now than there were before. COVID. And then on the other side yeah, for home owners and even, I guess for landlords is property values have gone up pretty substantially during, since COVID started because there’s just very little inventory, so prices have shot up.

So we’re, we’re kind of dealing with this whole COVID mess, but at the same time, knowing that prices just feel kind of artificially high right now because of what’s been going on. And so, uh, that’s like a huge loaded question ultimately, but kind of how do you integrate those things into. Talking about value when you’re talking to a seller.

John: [00:17:39] Yeah. So, uh, interesting questions. Um, we can break those

Mike: [00:17:44] down into a couple of smaller questions if

John: [00:17:45] you don’t know. It’s okay. It’s okay. I’m just thinking through it. So, uh, really I think having that conversation unless it needs to happen is kind of a trap. So I’m going into that question with the premise of, we’re [00:18:00] trying to convince someone that their house is worth a, when they’re trying to convince us that it’s worth B.

Yeah. And if you are in the real estate investment business, that’s, that’s not the conversation you want to be having. That’s a retail conversation, right? Um, that conversation is, is not going to do a lot for you as far as increasing your conversion rates. What you want to do is pivot that value conversation, not the price isn’t worth more because of COVID or is it worth less?

Two, what’s it worth to you right now? Uh, here is what I can offer. Let’s have a conversation about, is it worth even considering that offer? So shifting the conversation is where I’d want to take the answer to that question. If you’re having that conversation of, I think it’s worth 50. Well, I think it’s worth 60.

I think if we’re  that’s not a winning strategy and sales, you have to pivot the conversation. To listen, I’m going to give you an offer and I’m not sure it’s going to be more or less than, than what you were expecting, but let’s chat a little bit about what you want to accomplish. [00:19:00] And, um, so I know how to structure it and make sure I can maximize my offer.

And then you can just figure out at the end of this, Hey, with what I want to accomplish does accepting this offer makes sense or not make sense. And that’d be a pretty easy, easy answer for you. And then I’m shifting the conversation to, you know, what even got you started thinking about selling. Is there a, you know, is it, is it kind of a situation you want to get away from, or is there, do you want to use the money for something else?

Do you want to move across the country? What’s going on? And I want to redefine it and read it and just pivot that conversation to what’s your problem? What do you want to accomplish? And, and I’m going to ultimately give you an offer and then your only decision is in order to accomplish that. Is it going, is it worth it?

Is it worth taking the offer? And doing that you can, you can really stroke a tremendous amount of motivation. You can bring a lot of motivations to surface that your prospect may not have been thinking of. You can understand their situation a lot better. You’re going to build a lot more rapport, their urgency to take action.

The more they talk about their situation is going to increase. So I don’t know if I’m giving the right answer, but, but my answer [00:20:00] is that’s probably the wrong conversation to have, and we need to pivot.

Mike: [00:20:03] Yeah. Don’t look at the underlying issue of COVID it’s just the situation of what you think the value is versus what you can pay.

Right, right. Yeah. Yeah. I think there’s a lot of, there’s a lot of landlords that are hurting. Right. And I mean, there’s, let’s be honest. There’s a lot of landlords that didn’t buy, like. For me, all my rentals were bought at wholesale prices. And in fact, most of them were from many, many years ago. So like prices that are inconceivable now, uh, cause I’m actually older than John.

Uh, I was talking about age earlier, but, um, uh, but I think there’s a lot of landlords that, you know, they bought it off the MLS and they, in their mind, you know, or, or they bought a turnkey property at close to retail value and they never. Thought about like, well, what could go wrong? The house is newly renovated and like things go wrong, you know?

And of course, with, with COVID it’s even, uh, kind of unprecedented in terms of. You know, some States saying you don’t have to pay the rent and all that stuff. It’s just crazy. So I think what you really focus on there is that pain of like, you’re not even getting paid right now. When do you think you’re going to get paid again?

Right.

[00:21:00] John: [00:21:00] The reality of the situation is we all overpay for stuff happily because it’s worth it. Right. And we all take massive losses on things that we have when we sell them, because again, it’s worth it. So just think about any time in your life, where you said, you know what? I probably could have gotten more.

But I’m just thankful it’s over. I’m thankful I got rid of it. Yeah. I know. I overpaid for that, but here’s the opportunity it opens up. I’m glad I did. Right. And you’re excited about overpaying for something. So if you start thinking those terms, that’s how your seller’s thinking, right? It’s not always about getting, you know, fair market value to them.

Is what it actually accomplishes to them, not, not what Zillow says or what your, your, your maximum allowable offer is, or whatever you calculate the ARV to be. It’s, it’s going to be what’s it worth to them. So again, just another way to rephrase my answer is you’ve got to figure out what, moving that property is worth to them and get away from the ARV conversation.

Mike: [00:21:54] Yep. Yep. Well, guys, we’ve got time for a couple more questions, so please chat them in here. Uh, John saw this, [00:22:00] I got a question for you. How do you use, or how can you utilize the end of the year? Beginning of the year kind of phenomenon. Uh, and I’ve always kind of explained it as it’s like a health club.

Like people want to, you know, January 1st, there’s this line in the sand, that’s really just in their mind. And now I want to start the year and lose 40 pounds or whatever. There’s also people that have had. Problem rental property or a house they inherited, or a fixer upper of some sort that they’re like, I don’t want to deal with that next year.

I just want to get rid of it. How do you kind of utilize that in the year? Phenomenon of people wanting to start fresh?

John: [00:22:33] Yeah. I mean, you can use it just like you said. I, I typically don’t care. What time of year. It’s a great time to use scarcity. I can use really use scarcity no matter what time of year it is, but it works really well at this time.

Um, I’ll tell you when I was out, uh, training salespeople and kind of men buying houses coast to coast. Whenever we didn’t get one at the kitchen table, we would drive two blocks away and I would call and say, listen, We could give you a little bit more money if we can walk this up in the [00:23:00] next 60 minutes and we would often lock them up then because that’s scarcity.

So having, having a cutoff, and I think it speaks really to the broader, uh, sales strategy of having an offer expiration or having, uh, making a, no one, no right Treme salespeople out there, 20 acquisition agents and real estate investors, I think because there’s a fear of losing a potential deal. They never make their prospects actually make a decision.

Right? Think about it. Think about it. I’ll continue to follow up with you. And there’s never any cutoff where a decision has to be made. So the prospect never feels a fear of loss, a fear of actually losing the deal. So, um, cause the investors

Mike: [00:23:40] is afraid to say, I’m never going to call you again, right?

John: [00:23:43] Yeah, absolutely.

Uh, so sorry, my Alexa just went on and off. I don’t know what happened to you guys

Mike: [00:23:52] are winding it down. Guys, ask the questions. Cause the lights are going

out

John: [00:23:56] probably in the other room it’s like in it, but yeah, no. [00:24:00] And anyways, I want to just, just go back to that and say, Hey, every time you make an offer, you just word of advice.

You need an exploration, whether it’s by the time I, you know, if it’s not a yes. You know, by the time we wrap up our conversation. Totally cool. It’s no, uh, you know, don’t be a jerk about it. Uh, or Hey, you know, offers you a stand for a week. Obviously I can’t make an offer on a property and let it hang out there for a year.

If things change, my situation will change. Number of houses. I need changes the real estate market’s going to change. So I can, I can let this offer stand for three days, seven days, whatever it is. So you’ll do yourself a favor. If you just start giving a cutoff to when your

Mike: [00:24:34] offer expires. Yeah. Yeah. I remember when I first started this a long time ago now.

Um, and I used to sit there like, how good, how good is the offer for? And I was like, Oh, you know, 30 days. But even then I’d still be interested in buying it. And I was like, well, would I in hindsight, you know, so stupid, what would you do? You’d like, you’d go shop at everywhere in town. And like, I’m like plan B if they need it, which they would never need it.

So then we, then we got better. [00:25:00] Yeah. Awesome. Well, John, what do you think differentiates, let me ask you a question. What differentiates you? You, you’re a member of investor fuel as well. You know, you surround yourself with a lot of amazing people, just like I do for Schwartz, I’ve run in some of the same circles.

What do you think differentiates those that are doing really well at crushing it from those that are good, doing some deals, but kind of just getting by and kind of stuck in the grind. What do you think differentiates those two people from a sales perspective,

John: [00:25:26] from a sales perspective, It’s gonna sound funny, but it’s, uh, getting out of the sales role.

Um, I think the, the more successful people in invest a fuel, um, and, uh, you know, just, just investors in general. Um, even if they’re really good at it, uh, sometimes even if they like it pulling themselves out so they can grow, right. If they can have three acquisition agents that are half as good. Uh, the numbers typically work where you can turn up lead flow and, you know, still, uh, grow them at, uh, in the business.

So I think it’s [00:26:00] getting out of the seal rule so you can focus more on actually growing the business. And I, I train sales people, so I love to train an investor. So I don’t want to talk anyone out of, uh, investors buying houses, but at the same time, getting out of the sales role, hiring others to do it.

Even if they can only do it a fraction as well as you will allow you to focus on the actual and pull the levers that will grow your business and then turn everything off because now you’ve got the bandwidth to handle, increase everything else. So that’s when you can do sales. If you’re an investor business owner, entrepreneur is get out of the sales role and get yourself a couple of people who can do it

Mike: [00:26:36] for you.

Yeah, you can even say that about your whole business. Like we’re we’re in our way, right? I, I just, uh, before today’s event here, I did, uh, I recorded an investor fuel show with clay Rockwood. They’re doing a hundred wholesale deals a year and adding a hundred rental doors a year to their business. They’ve been in business for three years.

These guys are crushing it. And that’s what he said. That’s what he said is like, we just. I’m not the best at [00:27:00] anything that our company has to do. And I just had to get out of the way. And so I can focus on, you know, being the visionary or God forbid living your life. Right.

John: [00:27:09] You know, I’ve, I’ve, I, um, we’ve got one client in York, Pennsylvania.

This guy is probably one of the best natural salespeople I’ve met in my life. Like just, just he’s got it right. He was born with it. Um, that being said he doesn’t train the sales team. Um, he outsources that to, to me. Um, and the reason is, is not because he can’t do it. Um, but he knows his, his focus is spent elsewhere.

Now he’s doing 70 deals a month consistently and half for the last year or so last year. So we’re talking about how do you hit that volume? Um, and he’s not involved in the business that much anymore. So I just wanted to kind of throw that out there. He’s probably one of the best sales people I’ve met in my life.

He’s not selling his, he’s not even training his team, let alone selling the deals or buying the houses that are just positioning him because he knows he needs to [00:28:00] keep stepping up and taking kind of a higher level view of what’s going to grow the business instead of just taking that micro view.

Mike: [00:28:08] Yeah.

Awesome. Well, John, appreciate you spending time with us today. Great. To great to see you. My friend.

John: [00:28:12] Yeah. Good to see you, Mike,

Mike: [00:28:13] have a great Thanksgiving and a, well I’m sure we’ll be talking again soon. Okay. Thanks for joining me. On today’s episode, there are three ways I help successful real estate investors take their businesses and their lives to the next level.

First, if you’re in search of a community of successful real estate investors that help one another, take their businesses to the next level and a life changing community of lifelong friends. Please learn more about my investor fuel real estate mastermind. By visiting investor, fuel.com. If you’d like a cutting edge solution for the very best done for you lead generation on the planet where we’re handling the lead-generation for many of America.

Top real estate [00:29:00] investors. Please learn more@theinvestormachine.com. And lastly, if you’re interested in a free online community of professional real estate investors that isn’t full of spam solicitations and newbie questions, please join my free professional real estate investor Facebook group by visiting flipnerd.com/professional.

 

Source: flipnerd.com

Mortgage Refinance

Podcast #12: Hard Money Lending

Podcast 1 Hard Money Lending
For this podcast about hard money loans I sat down with Kay Battle of Common Sense Capital Solutions.  During the podcast we discussed investing in real estate, hard money lending, and how hard money loans can help investors.  If you want to learn more about hard money loans and how hard money lenders operate this is a great pdocast for you.
I hope you enjoy the podcast and find it informative.  Please consider sharing with those who also may benefit. Listen via YouTube: You can connect with Kay on LinkedIn.  You can reach out to Kay for more information on their lending products by emailing her at info@cscapitalsolutions.com and check out the company website Common Sense Capital Solutions.
You can connect with me on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube and Instagram.
About the author: The above article “Podcast #12:  Hard Money Lending” was provided by Luxury Real Estate Specialist Paul Sian. Paul can be reached at paul@CinciNKYRealEstate.com or by phone at 513-560-8002. If you’re thinking of selling or buying your investment or commercial business property I would love to share my marketing knowledge and expertise to help you.  Contact me today!
I work in the following Greater Cincinnati, OH and Northern KY areas: Alexandria, Amberly, Amelia, Anderson Township, Cincinnati, Batavia, Blue Ash, Covington, Edgewood, Florence, Fort Mitchell, Fort Thomas, Hebron, Hyde Park, Indian Hill, Kenwood, Madeira, Mariemont, Milford, Montgomery, Mt. Washington, Newport, Newtown, Norwood, Taylor Mill, Terrace Park, Union Township, and Villa Hills.
TRANSCRIPT
Paul: Hello everybody, this is Paul Sian real estate agent with United real estate home connections licensed in the state of Ohio and Kentucky and with me today I have Kay battle, she’s an investor herself and she also works for a hard money lending company and is part owner.
So, we’re going talk about a about her background and hard money lending, so Kay, thank you for being on, how are you today?
Kay: I am doing great, thank you for having me call
Paul: Thank you. So, you tell us a little bit about yourself, your background, how did you get started, I guess how did you get started investing first off?
Kay: Yes, I actually mentioned I am a real estate investor, I actually started in 2008 which was right after the market crash and so I we all know there were tons of deeply discounted and foreclosed properties on the market and so I just saw an opportunity to kind of jump in low risk not, much to lose so I tried it and it worked out great and so ever since then I’ve been actively investing 
Paul: Very nice, yeah that was a great time to invest, I wish I had, we had actually sold a property at that time that just wasn’t performing well and it was distance-wise us it was too far for me, you tell us how many units do you have currently?
Kay: So currently we have 35 units, they range from single families all the way up to nine units of types of properties total of 35 doors. 
Paul: Okay, are they all in these Cincinnati, Cincinnati area?
Kay: Yes, we are all in Cincinnati
Paul: You are still acquiring properties, what are your strategies or goals now?
Kay: Yes, I’m currently acquiring properties and actually have a property under contract at the moment, mostly what I’m focused on now is rehab, so flips just to build up my cash reserve and then I’ll probably purchase something for holding next year. 
Paul: Okay and how are you identifying your flips are you finding all in market deals off-market deals?
Kay: Well, so I use on market and wholesalers to look for off-market deals as well, so it’s a combination 
Paul: Okay, yeah, this market it’s a lot on market deals are highly competitive don’t make sense 
Kay: Yes very, very different from 2008
Paul: Why don’t you tell us about your company the company that you work for that’s a hard money lender what’s the name and how long have you been with them?
Kay: Yes, so as you mentioned I’m part owner of common sense capital solutions, we provide alternative funding for real estate investors and also small businesses and we’ve been in business for about a year and a half, now so I’ll start it at the beginning of 2018 and we just help people find solutions basically 
Paul: Okay, so primarily you’re doing mostly hard money loans, you don’t do anything conventional? 
Kay: Well, actually we do both, so I couldn’t do anything from you know months all the way up to 30-year times depending on the situation 
Paul: The primary focus of this podcast is more than hard money loans not everybody’s familiar with that anybody most people are familiar with a 30-year mortgage 50-year mortgage, so tell us about a hard money loan, I mean what exactly is a hard money loan?
Kay: Yeah, the hard money loans are typically used by real estate investors who either can’t obtain conventional financing or conventional financing doesn’t make sense for the situation, so maybe they have a property that the only one I hold for a short period of time and they don’t want to be tied down to a 15-year or 30-year mortgage that might have a prepayment penalty. So, generally speaking hard many miles are short-term either they are use of bridges and to more permanent onions and or for a situation where you’re only going to hold the property for a short period.
Generally the interest rates are higher because the risk is higher or the property is going to be the loan is only going to be held for a short period of time and also in most situations the loans are interest always so you’re only paying in terms of paying a monthly interest payment, which means the principal balance isn’t decreasing, over time and so as you go to either refinance or sell the property you will still owe the full balance of whatever your loan is.
Paul: Okay, and you mentioned short term what are the I guess what’s the shortest term and we’ll see the longest terms?
Kay: Generally, you know you can go from anywhere three to three months all the way up to three years, so usually beyond three years you won’t likely see a hard money loan 
Paul: Okay, presume you take into account the property itself, it’s floors can you tell us a little bit about that?
Kay: Yeah, so in general terms hard money loans are what is goods that are in accident they flown so a lot of emphasis is put on the property in the deal itself, however a lot of lenders are still going to want to get a little bit of information about the farmer so usually the credit requirements are fairly low but credit will be still taking into consideration also the person’s experience, so it can have you know a hit to your credit score heart many wells are definitely an option because there is still a lot of emphasis on the packet in the deal itself, so as long as the numbers make sense and they deal usually something can be worked out
Paul: Okay, what kind of down payment are you looking for most properties? 
Kay: Down payment can range anywhere from ten to twenty-five percent, depending on the type of property in a situation, there are certain situations where a down payment may not be required, I have seen those situations as well but it’s kind of rare so it leaves plant for its investment 
Paul: Somebody were to apply with your company how fast does it take you do a similar process like a pre-approval so how long would that take? 
Kay: Yes, in most situations we won’t need to do like a pre-approval we’ll just go straight into underwriting, so simple for Hard money loans it doesn’t take very long to actually close, I mean it’s run situations we can close in a few days and it can go two or three weeks 
Paul: Okay, so in terms of pre-approval, you’re still like we’re looking at credit somebody needs to you know they need a letter of intent from you or so that’s they could get that?
Kay: Yes, so usually we can do that whole process in a few days 
Paul: Okay, all right you mentioned the example of you know having a zero down payment loan that’s pretty interesting, can you elaborate on that, what sort of examples have you seen of that?
Kay: Yeah, generally I’ve seen those and the loan amount is fairly high, so we’re looking at plus a million but usually in those situations we’re taking into account what the after repair value is going to be, so if someone is doing a large rehab project or have a construction project where they’re adding a great level of value and equity into a situation, in those types of conditions the down payment you require because we’re going to take actually count the equity that is being filled into the deal 
Paul: So, that’s even equity that the person let’s say they are they’re doing sweat equity or they’ve got contractors who are going to that’s even that equity to you’re not considering already existing equity where it’s a great deal already it’s you know 50% LTV loan the value and then you also look at what they’re putting into the into the deal 
Kay: Exactly
Paul: Okay
Kay: Yeah, so that’s a great example so if someone has seen after repair value that’s going to be four million and they want to land fifty percent loan to value can be two million and so that’s kind of how we look at the situation 
Paul: Okay, you’re also taking a primary lien position?
Kay: Correct. Yes 
Paul: Okay and you mentioned we talking about two million four million or do you have any upper limits, minimum loan amounts, upper low amount?
Kay: Usually, for residential properties we’re looking at a 50k minimum, for commercial we’re looking at 100K minimum, and really the upper limit is pretty high looking at the several millions of dollars 
Paul: Okay and then we you know it’s a good segue into the you’re talking about commercial residential and the in a conventional space, I mean you’ve got your commercial loans they’re quite different than your residential loans so than residential two to four units, you know do you have that distinction or it’s the same type of loan product upfront applies regardless of commercial and residential?
Kay: Generally speaking all of the month that you are still considered commercial even if you’re doing you know working with residential properties because we require that they are in an entity, and so they’re going to be loan in a business, the terms and everything are going to be very similar, the only difference is that because many I’m wrong about 
Paul: Okay so you mentioned in an entity you mean like an LLC S corporations in a corporation, so that’s even another helpful thing for investors to I mean a lot of with your conventional loans, generally the conventional lenders don’t want LLC, they want you to individually on the deed but this case that’s an extra advantage for that.
Kay: Yes, exactly.
Paul: You had mentioned repayment terms we talked about interest only, I guess it’s optional on the buyer to they want to pay more if they want to pay down the principal as well, I mean are you able to you calculate that upfront or you just as they you know they get to do that however they want to do that?
Kay: It’s a case-by-case situation, we can’t look into that if there someone is interested in doing that generally most people like the interest-only payments because it helps keep the payment low while you’re in this transition phase and so you’re not having to pay additional money if you’re plenty the cells of property or if you’re playing so you’re in finance it into something that’s more than conventional most investors like to keep they’re paying it as well as possible during that time period 
Paul: Okay let’s say someone does start off with the intent of you know I’m looking alone when I’m looking for a fix and flip, but then they look at the property later and you know based on the value add and they think they can get better rents are you able to refinance them into a conventional loan that you no longer term 15-year, 20-year or 30-year or how does that work with your company?
Kay: Yeah definitely, so we can do finances, we can even cash out refinance and so if someone has built equity into the property and they were planning on selling it but then they change their strategy and once they hold it, we can refinance it and let them cash that equity out and then we of course maybe purchases as well.
Paul: So, the cashing out those include 20-year loan, 30-year loan?
Kay: Yes, even up to 30-years, yes.
Paul: Okay, do you hold all the loans on your books or do you already also broker some of these loans?
Kay: So, most of your loans are going to be held by the actual lender so we broker those out an they work with the paper
Paul: How many lenders do you work with private lenders?
Kay: So, we do real estate loans and also small business loan, so total we have about 15-lender that we work with on a real estate track, I would say it’s about 15/20
Paul: Okay, very nice you mentioned small business loans here to share some information about that?
Kay: Yes, on a small business side we have a wide range of moms as well, we can do asset based loans where a company can use their invoices as collateral also inventory and equipment we can do equipment finance, we have some unsecured lines of credit for businesses and a few other things with over some general loan that we are offering. 
Paul: So, talking about the loans, you mentioned interest rates are higher earlier in terms of your short term your hard money loans welcoming interest rates are we looking at there? 
Kay: Generally speaking, they start in the high single digits so maybe seven and eight percent and it can go well into the teens, so twelve fourteen percent 
Paul: What’s the reason for you know a low interest rate and the high interest rate, is there you know it’s based on the properties are based on the borrower?
Kay: Yeah, generally speaking it’s going to be based on leverage, so long to value also borrower experience plays a role and sometimes FICO score, not all, not in all situations but those are the key elements of determining what that interest rate is going to be.
Paul: So, you can get a loan to like it you know if I wanted to go I found a property that’s an ideal fixing flip and I can get the money to buy the property, are you also lending so I can you know pay contractors hire contractors to do repairs and if so then how is that done, how does that handle over time, do you think about all that money up front, do you draws?
Kay: Yeah, so we can find the purchase and the rehab in that situation and generally we go up to ninety percent, so we’ll do ninety percent of the total project cost which is the purchase list or we have. The purchase clients are dispersed for the seller at closing and then whatever you have to set aside for your construction or rehab will go into an escrow account and you work on a draw system, so as the worth of being included you can request a draw and get that money for that particular piece of the work
Paul: Okay, for each draw you acquiring invoices, are you requiring some sort of milestones or just?
Kay: No invoices, we just we have an inspector come out just to make sure the work is completed and don’t require that in the use you know specific contract, there’s anything like that you can do it work yourself you just want to know that the work has actually been completed and then you can have the draw
Paul: Great when it comes to the actual loan approval process, you mentioned underwriting before is there a committee, are you part of that committee or how does that work in your company?
Kay: No, I’m not part of the committee I do like a pre-assessment, so I’ll collect all of the documentation and kind of look over the deal, make sure that numbers and everything makes sense and then I submit it to the underwriting team and they actually do a full assessment, so they’ll pull the credit they’ll run the numbers and make sure that everything’s okay. In most situations we do require an appraisal so that will be ordered and generally I was saying it usually takes a couple to close everything
Paul: Okay, you mentioned appraisals and who pays for the appraisals and I guess out of their other upfront costs that the buyers should need to expect?
Kay: So, the only upfront cost generally is the appraisal and the flyer is responsible for that in most situations, there are some situations where the lender will pay for the appraisal so that’s the only thing that would need to be paid paint privates are closing. At closing for hard money loans usually they’re going to have to pay fees which are loan origination fees a point for the hard money loan, I mean those can rent anywhere from one to, I have seen it at five. So…
Paul: Five points?
Kay: Yeah, it a percentage point of whatever the loan amount is. 
Paul: Okay, and the reason for the variance and the loan points do that based on risk as well too?
Kay: Well, it’s based on race it’s also based on lender and situation depending on the long sides major advantage, you are at a lower loan amount, your points are likely going to be higher versus this to add you know a million plus or like your higher loan I’m not you okay a lower percentage point but of course if you’ve going to be higher in general because the loan amount is higher.
Paul: Okay, you handle all your loans and closings or deal with the title company?
Kay: We allow the borrower to choose their title company, so they can choose whatever they want to work with 
Paul: Do you service all 50-states as their in limits where you do not service?
Kay: Yes, so in most we can definitely learn in most states, there are certain situations that are a little bit more difficult one of those on the top of the head is like North Dakota, so some you know random states you have some restrictions and for the most part you can you can live in any of the states 
Paul: Okay great, and how can buyers get in touch with you if they will be interested in chatting with you and finding out more about your loan products and company?
Kay: Yeah, so you can reach me at info@cscapitalsolutions.comor you can visit the website which is www.cscapitalsolutions.com
Paul: Great and if you are listening to this podcaston my website, i’ll definitely provide your contact information there and leave a couple of your social media profiles too. 
Again, thank you for being on our podcast and enjoy the rest to day.
Kay: Yea, thanks for having me
Paul: Thank you 
Kay: Awesome
 

Source: cincinkyrealestate.com