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Minimalist LIfestyle
Minimalist LIfestyle, Money Etiquette

Holiday Spending Statistics for 2021

Rather than shopping in department stores and visiting Santa at the mall, this year’s holiday season is going to look a little different. You’ll likely be spending more time with your closest loved ones and exchanging gifts you ordered online. With the events of 2020, many have experienced unexpected changes in employment, income, and even health so the holiday budget is top of mind. To figure out what gifting budgets may look like this year, we ran our own holiday survey and collected 26 holiday spending statistics.

In 2019, roughly 729 billion dollars was spent during the holidays. This topped the charts, making it the biggest holiday season. This number may come as no surprise when you account for everyone on your shopping list. From your coworkers to family, holiday budgets can stretch thin to accommodate for everyone.

Wondering what others are spending on holiday gifts? Keep reading for our holiday spending statistics roundup, or jump to our infographic for our budget-friendly gifting etiquette for the workplace.

Average Christmas Spending

Average Christmas Spending

  • The average American planned to spend $942 on holiday gifts in 2019. (Gallup)
  • Last year, Americans spent $227.26 on non-holiday gift purchases such as decorations. (Alliant Credit Union)
  • Americans decide their holiday gift spending based on how close they are to the gift recipient (58 percent) and whether or not they’re family (28 percent). (Mint 2020 Holiday Survey)
  • Over 50 percent of holiday spending goes towards clothing and accessories. (Avant)
  • In 2019, holiday retail sales soared past $700 billion, making it the biggest holiday shopping season. (Statista)

Holiday Spending Statistics and Trends

  • Americans were holiday shopping early in 2019, with 43 percent starting in November. (Black Friday)
  • On average, 64 percent of holiday shoppers waited for a sale before making a purchase in 2019. (American Research Group)
  • In 2019, 59 percent of wish lists included gift cards. (National Retail Federation)
  • More than half of Americans would rather have cash over a gift. (Mint)
  • In 2019, 67 percent of shoppers were spending the most on holiday gifts for their children. (Black Friday)
  • Pet lovers are also big shoppers. In 2019, 77 percent of pet owners planned for their pets to be part of their holiday festivities. (The Dog People)

Holiday Spending 2019 vs. 2020

Holiday Spending 2019 vs. 2020

  • Fifty-one percent of Americans plan to spend the same on holiday gifts in 2020 as they did in 2019. (Mint 2020 Holiday Survey)
  • Roughly 40 percent of holiday shoppers plan to spend less this year, and 8 percent plan to spend more. (Mint 2020 Holiday Survey)
  • Over half of consumers are opting out of retail shopping due to health risks. (Accenture)
  • Seventy-four percent of people agree that events will only include a small get-together. (Morning Consult)
  • In addition, 47 percent of adults agree that holiday events will be canceled. (Morning Consult)

Holiday Retail Sales

  • In 2019, 38 percent of shoppers planned to browse in-store displays for inspiration. (Black Friday)
  • In 2019, holiday ecommerce sales increased by 13 percent with roughly $142 billion dollars spent. (Adobe)
  • Cyber Monday, a special day for holiday ecommerce discounts, totaled $7.4 billion spent in 2019. (Adobe)
  • Sixty-one percent of holiday shoppers in 2019 used a smartphone to complete an online order. (Thinking With Google)
  • On Black Friday in 2019, more than two-thirds of holiday shoppers made impulse purchases. (Bluecore)

Holiday Budget Statistics

  • Ten percent of Americans budget for gifts based on how much the gift receiver spends on them. (Mint: Holiday Survey 2020)
  • Eighteen percent of Americans are trying to pay down debt this holiday season. (Morning Consult)
  • Twenty-one percent of customers say they will be giving out fewer gifts this holiday. (Morning Consult)
  • Thirty-three percent of adults are trying to spend less and save more due to COVID-19. (Morning Consult)
  • People’s 2019 holiday budgets fluctuated based on where they lived. Urban shoppers planned to spend roughly $200 more than rural shoppers last year. (NPD)

Whether you’re planning to spend more or less this holiday season, check in on your budget as you go. Using our app, you can set a specific budget and get notifications when you go over. You can also check in on your financial goals each week using our weekly summary updates.

Planning to shop for your coworkers this season? Check out our visual guide on office gift-giving etiquette below.Download Gift-Giving Etiquette Guide

Sources: GlobeSmart

Methodology: This study was conducted for Mint using Google Surveys. The sample consisted of no fewer than 1,500 completed responses per question. Post-stratification weighting has been applied to ensure an accurate and reliable representation of the total population. Responses were collected October 23 – 27, 2020.

The post Holiday Spending Statistics for 2021 appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

Minimalist LIfestyle, Money

10 Minimalist Lifestyle Tips to De-Stress and Save Money

Minimalism has become a popular practice in recent years. When you live as a minimalist, you strive to only use things that serve a purpose. It’s about living simply and having only what you need to go about your daily life. For instance, some people may start a no-spend challenge or only fill their home with items they absolutely need. Not only could you save money, but you can also save time on cleaning and organizing.

Practicing minimalism is an ongoing process. You’ll always find ways to improve and modify your minimalism. To start, evaluate what currently serves a purpose in your life and what may be superfluous. When you practice a minimalist mindset, you’re choosing to live a more focused life. You may start with cleaning up your budget and then move on to organizing your home. Taking the first steps to declutter your life is a big move, but you might need a game plan to make these habits stick.

Many of us may have too much stuff, and may even be spending too much on unnecessary purchases. Establishing a consistent and healthy budget should help you cut down on the things you don’t need and may even reduce your anxiety and stress. To keep track of your minimalist budget, download our app for easy accessibility. If you’re considering doing some decluttering this season, skip to our infographic or keep reading for in-depth tips on practicing a minimalist lifestyle.

Minimalist Lifestyle Starter Tips

When first starting out your journey, it’s important to start small. From changing your shopping habits to going strictly digital, there are lots of ways to switch up your routine. Here are our go-to tips for kickstarting your minimalism journey.

1. Shop Quality, Not Quantity

Minimalism doesn’t mean you never go shopping, it just means you’re more intentional with your purchases. Whether you’re in need of a new pair of running shoes or work pants, invest in quality pieces that will last you a long time. Even though a higher price tag may be less than ideal at the time, you’ll likely save money in the long run by cutting down on frequent purchases. Not to mention, you’ll cut down on waste — one garbage truck of clothes is discarded every second.

2. Digitize Movies and Books

If you’re a big reader or movie watcher, consider going digital with your collection. This will save space in your home and make sure you can always find what you want. Instead of having to go to the store for your next read, you could get it at your fingertips in a couple of clicks. If you like to physically feel the book pages every time you flip the page, consider checking out your local library. You can find all sorts of books at no charge.

3. Eliminate, Eliminate, Eliminate

One of the most important parts of minimalism is cutting down on things you don’t need. To start decluttering, identify what serves a purpose in your life and what doesn’t. From there, start to see how you can cut down items that don’t add value to your life, and then get rid of them entirely. You could test the waters by doing a mindful money challenge before decluttering your whole life.

4. Invest In Reusables

As you start to declutter your home, consider what products could be reused. One simple change could be swapping out your disposable water bottles for a glass reusable one. Or, even bring your reusable takeaway coffee cup with you every time you visit your local cafe. Not only could you get a discount for bringing your own cup, but you’re also helping cut down on single-use products!

5. Give Everything a Place

Once you get into a rhythm, give every item a place. Get creative with storage bins and organizers to ensure you’re able to store exactly what you need. If you don’t have a spot for some of your extras, it may be time to consider if they are items you really need to keep. As your minimalist space falls into place, hold yourself accountable for putting away items once you’re done using them.

Minimalist Lifestyle Tips In-Post Image

5 Money-Saving Minimalism Best Practices to Follow

It’s one thing to start out your minimalism journey, but another to keep your practice going. To live an intentional life, there are some easy practices to follow. Keep reading to see where this could help save you more time, money, and stress.

1. Invest in Experiences

A popular practice in minimalism is prioritizing experiences over buying material items. Some people value the memories created from trips or classes over having the latest gadgets or fashions. Determine where you stand and spend intentionally.

As minimalism may cut down on your “extra” budget expense, you may also have more leeway to spend on other things. With this extra budget, be intentional with where you choose to put your money. Save up your takeaway coffee budget to invest in a weekend away with your family. You may find yourself saving more and spending less time on things that drain your budget.

2. Re-Audit Your Life Frequently

Take time to assess your current spending habits and then consistently review them. Always cut out things that take up space or events that drain your energy. As you get more comfortable, you may find yourself wanting to get rid of things you thought you couldn’t live without. For instance, your cluttered kitchen may be useless if you reach for the same items every time you cook — cut down on the things you haven’t used to make more room to cook.

3. Cut Meaningless Expenses

Turns out, the average American spends $18,000 a year on unnecessary purchases. As you review your budget, you may be able to cut out a large portion of these expenses. For things you may not want to completely eliminate, find inexpensive alternatives. You may swap a vacation across the county for a staycation in the comfort of your backyard.

4. Let Go of What You Can’t Control

Letting go of things you can’t control may seem easier said than done. To find that balance, start by focusing on things you love to do or have. Once you have narrowed down what’s most important to you, focus your energy on that. Being thankful for what you do have may even cut down on your budget. You may find yourself reusing what you do have rather than wanting more.

5. Appreciate What You Have

Practice gratitude and focus on the positives. Instead of scrolling through social media, write out three to five things you’re grateful for. Practicing gratitude first thing in the morning may put you in a positive mood and help you prepare for the day ahead of you. Being grateful for what you have might even cut your urge to overspend on things you don’t need.
could be a minimalist? If so, check out our top TED Talk tips for practicing minimalism and how it may benefit you. Turns out, sometimes living with less could mean so much more.

Sources: Making Sense of Cents | CNBC 1, 2

The post 10 Minimalist Lifestyle Tips to De-Stress and Save Money appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com