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Life Insurance
Automotive, Life Insurance

A Guide to Universal Life Insurance

Universal life insurance is a type of permanent life insurance, offering both a cash value and a death benefit. It offers numerous tax benefits and is often considered to be a combination of a life insurance policy and an investment; it can pay dividends, be cashed out, and offers a guaranteed death benefit at the same time.

How Does Universal Life Insurance Work?

Universal life insurance is split into two different components: the cost of insurance, known as the COI, and the cash value; and unlike whole life insurance and term life insurance, it can be adjusted over time. The cost of insurance is simply the price needed to keep the policy alive and it includes elements such as administration charges and mortality costs.

As for the cash value, this includes all accumulated premiums that exceed the necessary cost of insurance. This sum will increase as it earns interest in line with the market rate.  The policyholder can choose to increase or decrease premium payments, as well as the rate at which they are paid, which is why this type of insurance is also known as adjustable life insurance. 

The cash value can cover the cost of the universal life policy, but if there is not enough money to cover the premiums then the policy can lapse.

A universal life insurance policy offers two types of death benefit. One is a fixed sum that doesn’t change and guarantees your loved ones will get a specific amount when you pass away; the other is an increasing lump sum, in line with the policy’s cash value. This sum is tax-free but will not be paid if the cash value is withdrawn before the policyholder dies or if the premium payments stop. In such cases, the policy will lapse.

Whole life Policy vs Universal Life Policy vs Term Insurance Policy

There are pros and cons to all life insurance products. Some offer cash values, others don’t; some are easy to understand, others are a little more complicated. If you’re not sure which policy is right for you, speak with an insurance agent and they’ll discuss your options and help you decide.

A term life insurance policy is the better option for many applicants and covers them for a specific period of time, often from 10 to 30 years. There is no cash value or additional benefits, and the entire purpose is to provide a death benefit in exchange for monthly life insurance premiums.

A term life insurance policy is generally a cheaper and more widely available option as it provides some more assurances to the insurance company, as all policies are based on the probability of the individual dying during the term. 

By carefully weighing up these odds, using information such as their age, health, and family medical history, the insurer can almost guarantee a profit while still giving the policyholders what they need.

The younger you are, the less you will pay and the greater the death benefit will be. Whole life insurance and universal life insurance, however, have a cash value attached and this can be surrendered (surrender charges may apply) for the cash value. 

If the surrender value is not taken, and the policy premiums are paid, a guaranteed death benefit will be paid to the beneficiaries regardless of the age of the policyholder.

In this way, a fixed whole life insurance policy and a variable universal life insurance policy remain for the entire life of the policyholder, while giving their loved ones some assurances. These policies are often said to combine the benefits of a death benefit with a savings account, one that can boost your retirement income and provide an additional option when everything turns sour and you’re in dire need of a cash injection.

As a result of these extra benefits, whole life insurance policies typically charge higher premiums. For instance, a healthy 30-year old man can expect to pay between $200 and $300 a year for a term life insurance policy that lasts for 30 years and offers a $250,000 payout. This covers them until the age of 60, and statistically, there is a high chance they will outlive this policy, thus affording the life insurance company more leeway and allowing them to offer lower rates.

However, if a 30-year old man were to apply for a whole life insurance policy offering the same death benefit, they would likely be charged in excess of $2,000 a year.

Is Universal Life Insurance Right For You?

Whether a universal life insurance plan is right for you or not will depend on your age, health, budget, and goals. If you’re looking for a death benefit to protect your family and you don’t have a lot of money to spare, it’s probably not the best option and you should look for a term life insurance policy instead.

However, if you have a large estate to protect or a dependent who will rely on you for the life of the policy (such as a disabled child) a permanent life insurance policy is probably the better option. It’s also worth noting that insurance coverage can be switched and tweaked. 

A universal life insurance policy can be adapted to suit your growing needs, with a flexible premium and death benefit. A term life insurance policy, on the other hand, can be switched to a permanent life insurance policy if you find that you have more money and more options further down the line. 

This isn’t always the case, however, so if there is a chance you will want to switch make sure you use a life insurance company that will let you do this.

Bottom Line: A Safe Investment

A universal life insurance offers several benefits and combines an investment with a death benefit. If you need both of these and have the money to pay the premiums, it’s a good option. 

However, if you’re mainly looking for a death benefit or an investment, look into a term life insurance policy or a stock market investment, because neither of these options are strong enough on their own. It’s only when they are combined that universal life insurance begins to look worthwhile.

A Guide to Universal Life Insurance is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

Life Insurance

NYC Noise Complaints Increase 279% in Just 4 Months

Even Americans who haven’t visited know that New York City never sleeps. Endless streams of people on the street and taxi cabs clogging the roadways are just part of the ceaseless movement in the city. With a population nearing nine million people, New York City always has something going on within its five boroughs.

With all the commotion, it’s safe to say that New York City could be one of the loudest cities on earth. However, it seems that New Yorkers are getting tired of the noise more than usual this year. From COVID-19 lockdowns to widespread protests, New York City has become quite chaotic lately — is this the cause of the increase in noise complaints?

Methodology

We analyzed data from NYC OpenData, which includes a database of 311 calls placed within the city. We looked at noise complaint calls placed from February 1, 2020, to June 30, 2020, and from February 1, 2019, to June 30, 2019.

We also used available population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau to weigh noise complaint call data in relation to the population of each New York borough: The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island.

Noise complaints rise 106% in one year

a line graph showing an increase in new york city noise complaints from 2019 to 2020

It’s no secret that New York City is a noisy place –– the bustling streets and never-ending traffic jams create quite the cacophony of sound. However, it seems like residents are complaining about noise more than ever, especially since last year. Total complaints more than doubled from this time last year, increasing by 106 percent. 

Here’s a breakdown of the data between 2019 and 2020: 

Month 2019 2020 % Change
February 26,839 27,781 3.51%
March 33,567 37,396 11.41%
April 39,059 39,373 0.80%
May 40,339 77,628 92.44%
June 58,845 105,240 78.84%

Noise complaints increased by over 106 percent from 2019 to 2020 (within the measured time period). The city also saw a 97 percent increase in complaints from the beginning of April to the end of May 2020, marking the largest jump in noise complaints so far this year. These increases paint a striking picture of the considerable changes in city life over the last several months.

COVID-19, lockdowns and protests in NYC

an illustration showing a 279% increase in total noise complaints in New York City from February to June 2020

The beginning of March marked the start of quarantines, lockdowns and panic over the COVID-19 pandemic. With such a huge population density (27,000 people per square mile), New York City quickly fell into chaos as the virus spread through the city –– as of June 30, there were over 212,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in New York City alone.

Quarantines and lockdowns within the city meant millions of people began working from home. With so many now at home from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., it’s no surprise that New Yorkers had more to complain about when it comes to noisy neighbors and the sounds of city traffic. The data reflects this timeline perfectly, showing a difference of nearly 10,000 additional complaints logged in March (compared to February).

The end of May 2020 came with a new noise in New York City: protests. This unrest was widespread across New York City, with protests in all five boroughs. The sheer volume of these protests can be seen clearly in the data we analyzed. From the beginning of May to the end of June, noise complaints increased by 79 percent. Additionally, complaints of “loud talking” more than doubled from the beginning of April to the end of May, about the time when the protests began.

Battle of the boroughs: Who complains the most in NYC?

Despite having a smaller population than other boroughs, The Bronx has logged the most noise complaints in 2020 so far –– a total of 81,869 complaints logged from February to June.

Because populations differ across the five boroughs, we divided each borough’s total complaints by its respective total population to find comparable percentages.

Borough-specific data is below:

  • The Bronx: 81,869 total complaints (6 percent of the population)
  • Manhattan: 74,661 total complaints (5 percent of the population)
  • Brooklyn: 73,899 total complaints (3 percent of the population)
  • Queens: 49,469 total complaints (2 percent of the population)
  • Staten Island: 6,635 total complaints (1 percent of the population)

A borough rich in local culture, The Bronx has been called the birthplace of hip-hop and salsa, is home to Yankee Stadium and boasts one of the most diverse populations in the city. This diversity could be related to a higher volume of noise complaints, especially since a 2017 study published in the Environmental Health Perspectives Journal determined that neighborhoods with higher poverty rates and larger minority populations experience more noise pollution than other neighborhoods.

New York City explodes with fireworks

From the beginning of April to the end of June this year, complaints about illegal fireworks increased by a staggering 283,595 percent –– only 19 complaints were logged in April, while complaints in June totaled 53,902. Brooklyn is seeing the majority of complaints about fireworks, with approximately one in three complaints originating from the largest of the boroughs.

Fireworks are the second most complained-about noise in New York City from February to June, with loud music and parties taking the first place prize for the most complained-about noise (157,823 total complaints during this time period). With this in mind, it’s important to note that 311 OpenData categorizes these complaints in their own section, rather than grouping them with other noise complaints.

Here is a breakdown of the noises New Yorkers complained about the most in June 2020: 

  • Loud music and parties: 73,238 complaints
  • Fireworks: 53,902 complaints
  • Traffic: 10,795 complaints
  • Loud talking: 7,213 complaints
  • Construction: 2,014 complaints

While summer fireworks in New York City have always been present, this year is definitely unique. The unusual volume of fireworks has raised many conspiracy theories among New Yorkers, with some claiming the government is using the fireworks to desensitize the public to “war-like sounds.” Others claim the police are using the fireworks as a punishment for the recent protests, while some say New Yorkers are simply bored in quarantine.

Whatever the cause of the fireworks, they are wreaking havoc across the city. Countless residents have been hospitalized with firework-related injuries and the city government has created a police taskforce to curb illegal firework activity, with police donning riot gear and arresting anyone believed to be involved.

New York City has always been loud, but 2020 seems to have turned up the volume in the city. Noise complaints are at an all-time high with no end in sight. If you’re living in New York City this summer, there are easy ways to soundproof your home.

Sources

U.S. Census Bureau | New York City OpenData: 1, 2 | Gothamist | The Atlantic

The post NYC Noise Complaints Increase 279% in Just 4 Months appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

Life Insurance

The Safest Place in Your Apartment During a Tornado

Tornadoes are no joke. With winds that can top 250 miles per hour, these storms can clear a path a mile wide and 50 miles long. Emerging from afternoon thunderstorms, tornadoes usually include hail and high winds. This is why you need to take cover when the warning siren goes off.

The average alert time for a tornado is 13 minutes, but there are environmental clues one is on its way. The sky transforms into a dark, greenish mass and begins to roar like an oncoming train.

Tornadoes can happen anywhere

Tornadoes occur all over the world, but, “In terms of absolute tornado counts, the United States leads the list, with an average of over 1,000 tornadoes recorded each year,” according to the National Centers for Environmental Information.

The U.S. experiences tornadoes all over the country, but one particular area gets hit the hardest. Known as Tornado Alley, the area covers South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Northern Texas and Eastern Colorado.

tornado alley map

Source: Accuweather

Whether you live in an area where tornadoes are common or not, it’s important to know how to stay safe in your apartment. Just as you create a plan for many emergency situations, know where to go in your apartment during these destructive storms.

Staying safe in an apartment building

On average, tornadoes move at speeds of about 10-20 miles per hour. They rarely travel more than six miles, which means they can damage a whole section of town. For that reason, if a tornado is in your area, seek shelter.

Basement

While basements are not an option in all apartment buildings, get low if you can during a tornado. Heading to the basement or even the sub-level of a parking garage offers the most insulation against the weather.

If your building doesn’t have a basement, try to get to the lowest floor if you can, regardless of whether or not it’s underground.

Interior rooms

The next safest option during a tornado is any area fully-inside the building. This means no outside walls. Under a stairwell, an interior hallway or even a room within your apartment can work. Make sure there are no windows.

Crouch down as low as you can get with your face down. Cover your head with your hands for extra protection or bring in a bike helmet to wear during the storm. Because of your location, there’s still a chance for debris to fall, so protecting your head is important.

Bathroom

Even if they have an exterior wall or windows, bathrooms are safe because the thick pipes inside the walls insulate you during a tornado. Climb into the bathtub if you have one and bring in your bed’s mattress to serve as a cover.

Closet

These are usually interior rooms by design, making closets a good choice to ride out a tornado. Pull your clothes off their hangers and grab any bedding from the shelves to insulate yourself. Don’t forget to close the closet door for even more protection.

tornado

Avoid dangerous areas

Tornadoes kill about 80 people each year, according to John Roach at AccuWeather. There was a decrease in tornado fatalities in 2018, with only 10 Americans dying. This is the lowest number since record-keeping started in 1875.

Yet, people still lose their lives to these dangerous storms. While knowing the safest places to be in your apartment during a tornado, you should also know what areas to avoid.

Windows

With gusting winds strong enough to shatter glass, windows become dangerous during a tornado. Even worse, once a window breaks, all kinds of debris can blow inside.

If you can’t stay completely clear from windows during a tornado, do your best to block them and protect yourself. If you can, duct tape a blanket over the window or slide a big piece of furniture in front to keep glass out of your apartment.

Heavy objects

While it may seem like a good idea to slide under your bed or inch behind a heavy dresser for protection during a tornado, it’s not. These pieces of furniture can shift during a storm or even fall through the floor. You don’t want to get pinned under or against something so heavy you can’t move.

Preparing for a tornado

If you live in an area where tornado warnings are common, consider creating a tornado evacuation kit to have on hand. These can include items you’d need to safely and easily exit your apartment after a tornado passes, such as:

  • Portable radio
  • Flashlight
  • Extra batteries
  • Cell phone charger
  • Bottled water
  • Spare set of car and apartment keys
  • Photocopy of your driver’s license
  • Cash

Having these items ready can make it easier to evacuate your building after the storm.

Remaining safe after the tornado passes

Being safe doesn’t stop once a tornado passes. Dealing with the aftermath of this type of storm includes new dangers. Make sure to watch out for fallen or exposed utility lines, downed trees or limbs and debris.

Exercise extreme caution when leaving your apartment building. If enough damage occurs, you may have to stay out of your apartment. You may not see the dangers, so it’s important to wait for an official word before reentering. When you can, take pictures of any damage to your own property since you’ll most likely have to file an insurance claim.

Preparing for the unexpected such as weather, fire or even flood means having the right supplies and the best information on how to stay safe.

The post The Safest Place in Your Apartment During a Tornado appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com