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Credit Cards
Credit Cards

Freezing Your Credit

In the age of paperless transactions, identify theft is something that virtually all of us are susceptible to. If your identity is stolen, the consequences can be severe, and in some cases, can take years to recover from. One way to be proactive against fraud and defend yourself from identity theft, is to freeze your credit report with each of the three major credit bureaus—Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. 

Placing a credit freeze on your credit report will stop identity thieves from being able to open new accounts, lines of credit, or make any large purchases in your name, regardless of whether or not they have your Social Security number or any other sensitive information. 

What a credit freeze means

A credit freeze is a process that shuts off access to your credit reports at your request. Without your verified consent, your delicate information cannot be acquired. This means that if someone were to attempt to apply for credit in your name, your report would come up as “frozen,” and therefore the creditor would not be able to see the information needed for the application to be approved.

You can unfreeze your credit at any time by using a PIN or a password. 

Reasons to freeze your credit

It might be a good idea to freeze your credit if you’re experiencing any of the following situations:

  • Your data has been compromised in a data breach: It happens. If you’ve been a victim of a data breach and personal information related to your identity has been leaked or made vulnerable to cyber criminals, a credit freeze can offer you some extra protection. 
  • You have reason to think you’ve been a victim of identity theft: Perhaps you’ve checked your credit recently and noticed open accounts that you don’t recognize. Maybe you’ve been getting phone calls from collections agencies requesting payments from accounts you know you didn’t open. While a credit freeze won’t be able to stop them from using accounts a thief has already opened, it can stop them from opening any more. 
  • You want to protect your child from identity theft: According to the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act, parents and legally guardians of children 16 years old and younger have the right to open a credit account for their child with the sole purpose of putting a freeze on it to protect them from identity theft. 

How to freeze your credit 

The process of freezing your credit is simple but does require a few steps. You will need to get in touch with each of the three major credit bureaus one by one and request a credit freeze:

  • Experian: Contact by phone at 800-349-9960 or go to their website.
  • Equifax: Contact by phone at 888-397-3742 or go to their website.
  • TransUnion: Contact by phone at 888-909-8872 or go to their website.  

The credit bureaus will ask you for your Social Security number, your date of birth and other information to verify your identity.

Once you freeze your credit, your file will be unattainable even if a thief has sensitive information such as your social security number or date of birth. If you need to use your credit file, you can unfreeze your credit report at any time. 

How to unfreeze your credit

Once you’ve frozen your credit file, it will be remain blocked until you decide that you would like to unfreeze it. You will need to unfreeze your credit report in order to open a new line of credit or make a major purchase. 

Unfreezing your credit file is simple. All you will need to do is go online to each credit bureau website and use the personal identification number (PIN) that you used to place the freeze on the account. If you don’t want to complete this task online, you can also unfreeze your credit file over the phone or through postal mail. 

When the unfreezing process is done online or by phone, it is completed within minutes of submitting the request. However, if you send your request via mail, it will take much longer. 

Keep in mind that you don’t necessarily need to unfreeze your credit through all three of the major credit bureaus if you don’t want to. For instance, let’s say you plan to apply for credit somewhere. You can ask the creditor which credit bureau it will go through to pull up your report, and only unfreeze that one credit bureau. 

You may also have the option to unfreeze for a specific amount of time. Once the time is up, your credit file will automatically freeze again. 

Credit freeze pros and cons

There are a few reasons why you might want to freeze your credit in this day and age, but just like with anything else, there are pros and cons to credit freezing. Here is a general breakdown of the benefits and downfalls of putting a freeze on your credit report:

Pros:

  • It prevents thieves from opening new lines of credit: With a credit freeze placed on your account, no one will be able to open a new line of credit or any other type of account requiring a credit check using your personal data. Anyone trying to commit fraud will be stopped in their tracks as soon as lenders notice that the report is frozen. 
  • It won’t affect your credit score: Freezing your credit report will not damage your credit score. Additionally, if you’ve been a victim of identity theft, freezing your credit report could actually protect your credit score from being damaged due to fraud. 
  • It’s free: It used to be the case that some credit freezes would cost a fee, but that is no longer the way it works. 

Cons

  • It requires some effort: Putting a credit freeze on your credit report takes some effort. You will need to get in touch with all three credit bureaus. 
  • You will need to remember your PINs: A PIN is required to lift or freeze your credit report. If you lose it, you will need to jump through extra hoops to create a new one.

It can’t stop thieves from accessing your existing accounts: Credit freezes can only stop fraudsters from opening new accounts using your information. If you’ve already been a victim of identity theft, a credit freeze can’t block thieves from committing fraud with your current accounts. This means that thieves can still make a purchase using a credit card they stole from you.

Freezing Your Credit is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

Credit Cards, Insurance

Your Car Insurance Company is Probably Planning to Rip You Off — Unless You Do This

Some of the links in this post are from our sponsors. We provide you with accurate, reliable information. Learn more about how we make money and select our advertising partners.

Watch out for your wallet! Do you live in one of the five U.S. states where car insurance rates are going up this year?

According to industry reports, rates are going up this year in Florida, Indiana, Massachusetts, New York and Rhode Island. For example, New York rates are expected to rise by 1.2%, and Indiana’s by 1.1%. Annoying, isn’t it? Here you are, probably driving less than ever, and they want to raise your car insurance premiums.

They’re ripping you off. The good news? There’s something you can easily do about it.

A website called Insure.com makes it super easy to compare car insurance prices and make sure you’re not getting ripped off. All you have to do is enter your ZIP code and your age, and it’ll show you your options.

Are you driving less than 50 miles a day? Do you have zero DUIs on your record? You could qualify for discounts.

Using Insure.com, people save an average of $540 a year.

Yup. That could be $500 back in your pocket just for taking a few minutes to look at your options.

Mike Brassfield (mike@thepennyhoarder.com) is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. He lives in one of these five states, and he’s mad about this.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com

Credit Cards

By: Jeanine Skowronski

It would depend on the terms of the lease — some may specify that the tenant is responsible for damages above the security deposit. But state tenant laws also vary, so you want to consult a consumer attorney in your state about your best recourse.

Thanks,

Jeanine

Source: credit.com

Credit Cards, Investment Properties

How Removing Your Name from a Shared Credit Card Affects Your Credit Score

Credit cards exceptional financial instruments. They allow you to buy without any cash and earn rewards while at it. Another interesting feature is the option of adding another person as an authorized user to your card. However, credit card usage does have a huge impact on your creditworthiness. So, does removing your name from a […]

The post How Removing Your Name from a Shared Credit Card Affects Your Credit Score appeared first on Credit Absolute.

Source: creditabsolute.com

Credit Cards

Bypass Chase 5/24 Rule On Business Cards With Black Star ‘Just For You’ Offers

Update 2/8/21: More targeted.

Original Post:

It has long been possible to bypass the Chase 5/24 rule on personal cards by looking for ‘Just For You’/’Selected For You’ green check mark offers. Yesterday reddit user GR1022 saw an offer on a business card with a black star saying ‘For Business Owners’ when checking for Just For You offers. This offer has a fixed APR and despite being over 5/24 GR1022 & others (gofarhaveacigar & Pointsmiles) have been approved. I haven’t been able to independently verify this as the offers don’t show up for me, but based on the amount of datapoints this seems to be working. The offers look as follows:

 

 

Some other information:

  • These are showing up on personal accounts (not on personal & business combined accounts)
  • Standard offers are showing (e.g $500 on the Chase Ink Cash/Chase Ink Unlimited and 80,000 on the Chase Ink Preferred)
  • After applying for one card the other offers will disappear, so apply for the card you want the most first

Post history:

  • Update 12/30/20: More targeted.
  • Update 12/6/20: More people targeted.
  • Update 1/28/20: More people targeted
  • Update 11/16/19: More people targeted
  • Update 8/25/19: Looks like more people have been targeted, worth checking to see if that includes you.
  • Update 6/4/19: Multiple reports today that new people have been targeted for these offers which are immune to 5/24 (1, 2, 3). Be sure to check for the fixed APR.
  • Update 4/25/19: Many more data points indicating this is bypassing 5/24. Interestingly after applying some people are still seeing the other offers and have successfully been approved for a second card. For most people the other offers disappear after applying but that doesn’t seem to always be the case. Best idea is to still apply for the card you want the most first and then maybe you get lucky and can get a second card a swell.

Source: doctorofcredit.com

Credit Cards

Should You Get Another Credit Card? What to Consider

A woman looks at her laptop computer with a thoughtful look on her face.

Credit cards play a significant role in your financial life—from establishing credit and determining your buying power to potentially being a financial lifeline during times of crisis.

Before you add another credit card to your wallet, you should consider your buying habits and financial strategies. The answers to the following five questions may help you decide if another credit card is right for you.

New Cardholder? Wait a Year

If you’re a new cardholder, try holding off for one year before applying for another credit card. It can take six months to a year for your card usage to affect your credit score.

Without an established credit history, it may be difficult to get lenders to extend you credit. A short credit history can also impact your interest rates, keeping them higher than desirable. If you’ve had your credit card for less than a year, getting a new one may not be the best choice right now.

What to Do

Be patient. Use your current credit card on a regular basis and pay on time and in full each month. Your payment history is the largest factor that determines your credit score. When you do apply for a second credit card, the lending company will see how responsible you’ve been. They will then be more likely to extend you credit with a lower interest rate.

Trying to Build Credit? One Card May Be Enough

If you want another card because you’re trying to build your credit, one card may be enough. The most important part of building credit is using your existing accounts wisely—not adding more. Two cards could improve your credit utilization ratio, as long as you don’t rack up debt on either card. And if you don’t plan on actually using your second card, keep in mind that some credit card companies have a policy of canceling credit cards due to inactivity—and a canceled credit card can cause your credit score to take a dip.

What to Do

Instead of getting a second card, focus on using your current cards more effectively. Pay your balances on time and in full to help improve your credit score. If you’re ready to open a new type of account to increase your account mix, consider a small personal loan.

Already Have Multiple Cards? Review Your Payments

It may be tempting to have more spending power at your disposal, but before you apply for another credit card, make sure you can financially handle it. Examine how you’re currently managing your credit cards.

Are you struggling to pay the minimum each month? Are you unable to make payments on time? If you answer “yes” to either of these questions, it’s probably not a good idea to apply for another card right now.

What to Do

If you’re already having a hard time paying your credit card bills, ask yourself why you think you should get another credit card. Is it because you’ve already maxed out the cards you have in use? Don’t open yourself up to more debt by opening another line of credit.

Instead, develop a plan to lower your current credit card balances and create a budget to help organize and control your spending. A balance transfer credit card may be a solution if you’re looking to consolidate your debt into one, easy-to-track payment plan.

TD Cash Credit Card

Apply Now

on TD Bank’s secure website

Card Details
Intro Apr:
0% Introductory APR for 6 months on purchases


Ongoing Apr:
12.99%, 17.99% or 22.99% (Variable)


Balance Transfer:
0% Introductory APR for 15 months on balance transfers


Annual Fee:
$0


Credit Needed:
Excellent-Good

Snapshot of Card Features
  • Earn $150 Cash Back when you spend $500 within 90 days after account opening
  • Earn 3% Cash Back on dining
  • Earn 2% Cash Back at grocery stores
  • Earn 1% Cash Back on all other eligible purchases
  • $0 Annual Fee
  • Visa Zero Liability
  • Instant credit card replacement
  • Digital Wallet
  • Contactless Payments

Card Details +

Running a Balance? Check the Interest Rates

Carrying a balance from month to month can affect your credit score by increasing your utilization rate. It can also put a big dent in your wallet depending on your interest rates. If you regularly make your monthly minimum payments but keep a balance, it could be beneficial to get a new card with lower rates—as long as you can use it responsibly. If you want to keep your old card active, split the same amount of spending between the two cards, rather than doubling your spending, and your utilization rates and fees could go down.

What to Do

Check the interest rates on your current card. If you’ve been keeping up with your payments and your overall credit score is good, you could qualify for a better interest rate to replace this one with. While some credit cards may hit everything on your perk and benefit checklist, if the interest rate is too high, skip it. Look for credit cards with low interest rates that will be sustainable for long-term use.

Got Excellent Credit? Try a Rewards Credit Card

If you have established excellent credit, you may be receiving offers from a variety of credit card companies. If you know that you can financially handle another credit card and are looking to take advantage of the many perks and rewards available, you may want to consider applying for another credit card.

What to Do

Before you move forward, do your research on each one. Don’t get taken in by flashy offers that won’t benefit you in the long run. The best perks and rewards are the ones that suit your lifestyle. Decide which are most important to you and would give you the most bang for your buck.

Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

Apply Now

on Chase’s secure website

Card Details
Intro Apr:
N/A


Ongoing Apr:
15.99% – 22.99% Variable


Balance Transfer:
15.99% – 22.99% Variable


Annual Fee:
$95


Credit Needed:
Excellent-Good

Snapshot of Card Features
  • Earn 60,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That’s $750 when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®. Plus earn up to $50 in statement credits towards grocery store purchases.
  • 2X points on dining at restaurants including eligible delivery services, takeout and dining out and travel & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards®. For example, 60,000 points are worth $750 toward travel.
  • With Pay Yourself Back℠, your points are worth 25% more during the current offer when you redeem them for statement credits against existing purchases in select, rotating categories.
  • Get unlimited deliveries with a $0 delivery fee and reduced service fees on eligible orders over $12 for a minimum of one year with DashPass, DoorDash’s subscription service. Activate by 12/31/21.
  • Earn 2x total points on up to $1,000 in grocery store purchases per month from November 1, 2020 to April 30, 2021. Includes eligible pick-up and delivery services.

Card Details +

Ready to Apply? Go for It

Once you’ve learned how your charging and payment habits can affect your credit score, you can determine if and when the time is right for you to get another credit card. Our Credit Card Finder makes it easy to find the best card for your needs.

Find Your Credit Card

The post Should You Get Another Credit Card? What to Consider appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com

Credit Cards

Should You Sign the Back of Your Credit Card?

Should You Sign the Back of Your Credit Card?

Signing the back of your credit card is an important security step for protecting your card’s information if it should fall into the wrong hands. Merchants are supposed to check that the signature on the card matches the signature on the sales receipt as a security precaution. If a card has no signature on the back, they aren’t required to process the ensuing payment.

Should You Sign the Back of Your Credit Card?

Signing the back of your credit card is always better than not, without exception. It’s another step provided by your credit card company to try and keep your personal information as safe as possible. When used in conjunction with the card verification value (CVV) on your card, it creates a line of defense should a fraudster try to swipe your plastic.

While the signature itself doesn’t protect you, the ability for a salesman to match it to your existing official signatures is where its value lies. This is done most commonly with your driver’s license, or if you’re abroad, your passport is a fine stand-in. In other words, taking a few seconds to sign that little black or white strip could be the difference between your identity being stolen and not.

Here’s a look at how the major credit payment networks handle unsigned cards:

Mastercard

Mastercard urges merchants in its payment network not to accept charges from customers with unsigned credit cards. On the back of every Mastercard, it even says “not valid unless signed.”

The company tries to instill in merchants that they should not process customer transactions unless the customer’s signature appears in the signature space on the back of the card.

If the card has no signature, merchants are to request the customer sign the card. A merchant also will need to see a confirming form of identification.

Visa

Should You Sign the Back of Your Credit Card?

At Visa, merchants must verify that the signature on the back of any card matches the customer’s signature on the transaction receipt and any identification. They want to know you are who you say you are and recreating the same signature on demand when you sign for a credit card transaction is one way to do it.

Visa considers an unsigned credit card to be invalid. The words “Not Valid Without Signature” appear above, below or beside the signature panel on all Visa cards. Turn over the card and you’ll see it. And like Mastercard, Visa urges merchants not to accept unsigned credit cards.

When a customer presents an unsigned Visa card to a merchant for payment, Visa requires a merchant to check the customer’s identification by requesting a government-issued form of ID.

Where permissible by state law, the Visa merchant may also write the customer’s ID serial number and expiration date on the sales receipt. (Beginning in California in 1971, the recording of personal information during credit card transactions has become illegal, with the passage of the Song-Beverly Credit Card Act.)

Visa also instructs merchants to ask the customer to sign the card, within full view of the merchant. They then check that the customer’s newly written signature on the credit card matches the signature on the customer’s ID. If a customer refuses to sign a Visa card, the card is considered invalid and cannot be processed. Merchants will then be forced to ask the customer for another form of payment.

Discover

Discover keeps things very simple. The company urges its cardholders to sign the backs of their Discover cards as soon as they activate them.  This is because the signature makes the card valid and a cashier may decline the transaction if the card is not signed. 

American Express

American Express also urges retailers to compare a customer’s signature on the back of an American Express card with the transaction sales receipt. And if an American Express card is presented unsigned, the clerk is to request a photo ID of the customer with a signature. Following this, they must request the customer sign the back of the American Express card and the sales receipt while the clerk is holding on to the customer’s photo ID.

Writing “See ID” on a Credit Card

Should You Sign the Back of Your Credit Card?

Writing “see ID” or “check ID” on a credit card might seem like a great way to protect from fraud. But it actually may invalidate the card. This is because only your valid signature that a merchant can match with a signature on a sales receipt is acceptable. In some cases, the merchant may ask you for another card to make your purchase. To save yourself from a slower-than-needed transaction at the cash register, sign your credit card as intended.

Tips for Protecting Against Credit Card Fraud

  • Only carry the credit cards you need. When you travel, keep a list of the credit cards that you have with you. Make note of their full account numbers and expiration dates, as well as contact numbers for the issuers. It will come in handy if something should happen to your wallet, phone or both when traveling.
  • Go paperless and start checking your credit card statements online to avoid having to keep and shred your paper statements. Just be sure to keep your online passwords in a safe place and to update them from time to time.
  • Check your credit card transactions each month to check for errors or suspicious activity. Quickly report any transaction you don’t recognize to your card issuer.

Find the Top 3 Financial Advisors for You

  • Finding the right financial advisor that fits your needs doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that will help you achieve your financial goals, get started now.

Photo credit: Â©iStock.com/PeopleImages, Â©iStock.com/hsyncoban, Â©iStock.com/RichLegg

The post Should You Sign the Back of Your Credit Card? appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

Source: smartasset.com

Credit Cards, Credit Repair

Can I Sue a Company for Sending Me to Collections?

A woman in a wheelchair sits with her laptop in front of her as she talks on the phone.

It happens. A collections notice shows up, a debt collector starts calling or you find a negative report on your credit history, but you know you paid the account in question. Can you sue a company for sending you to collections for money you didn’t owe? Find out more about what the law says about your rights when it comes to protecting your credit history.

How Does the Law Protect Your Rights Regarding Credit Collections and Reporting?

Numerous federal and state laws protect your rights to fair and accurate credit reporting. Some of those laws also cover your rights as a consumer to fair debt collection practices. A few of the laws that might come into play are as follows:

  • The Fair Credit Report Act ensures your right to an accurate consumer credit profile. It obligates companies to report truthful information on your credit report. It also provides some ways you can challenge information you think is inaccurate.
  • The Fair Debt Collections Practices Act  also helps ensure creditors are honest when reporting or collecting debts. Additionally, it prohibits collectors from engaging in harassing or abusive behavior to collect a debt, including contacting you excessively or at inappropriate times. You might be able to report or seek remedies from collectors who break these FDCPA rules for fair collections.
  • The Truth in Lending Act is part of the Consumer Credit Protection Act. This law deals with what information lenders must disclose, how they can advertise their products and rates and what rights you have when a lender isn’t truthful or transparent.

Credit law can be complex. If you’re not sure which laws cover you or what the best course of action is in your case, you might need to consult with an attorney.

Can You Sue a Company for Sending You to Collections?

Yes, the FDCPA allows for legal action against certain collectors that don’t comply with the rules in the law. If you’re sent to collections for a debt you don’t owe or a collector otherwise ignores the FDCPA, you might be able to sue that collector.

It’s a good idea to do everything you can under the law to protect your rights before you sue. That might include requesting validation of any debt within 30 days of receiving the first notice, for example. But even without that action, the collector can still be liable if it breaks the law.

According to the FDCPA, civil liabilities are limited to the amount of damages actually experienced plus any additional damages awarded by the court. Those additional damages are limited to $1,000 in individual cases and $500,000 in class action suits.

Can You Sue a Company for False Credit Reporting?

Yes, you might be able to sue a company for false credit reporting. However, before you seek a civil remedy through the courts, you should properly exercise your rights under the law.

Begin by challenging the information with the credit bureau. False information hits credit reports for a variety of reasons, including misunderstandings and honest mistakes such as clerical errors. When you sent a credit dispute letter, the bureau must investigate and respond within a time frame dictated by the regulation.

The investigation typically involves contacting the reporting creditor or collection agency. That entity is given a chance to demonstrate the information is accurate via appropriate documentation. If the credit bureau determines the information is inaccurate or can’t be proven, it typically removes or corrects it.

The Fair Credit Reporting Act lists civil penalties for people or businesses that willfully refuse to comply with accurate credit reporting. Actual damages are limited to a range of $100 to $1,000. You might also be able to recover attorney’s fees and additional punitive damages the court can award on a case-by-case basis. Punitive damages are those awarded as a type of punishment for the person or business engaged in wrongdoing.

Coronavirus Impact on Credit Reporting and Your Rights

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act of 2020 (CARES Act) made some temporary modifications to creditors’ legal requirements for reporting. For example, it requires creditors to report accounts as current in certain situations where forbearances were granted.

Forbearance means the creditor agrees you don’t have to pay the loan for a certain period of time. During that time, you won’t be penalized by having the account reported as late.

If you think your collection or credit reporting issue should be be protected under the CARES Act, consider consulting a lawyer. One can help you understand your rights, which laws affect them and any action you might take next.

How Do You Sue a Collection Agency or Other Creditor?

We’re not legal experts at Credit.com, so we can’t give legal advice. We’ve provided a good amount of information to help you understand your rights under the law. But if you think suing a debt collector or other creditor is the next best step, consult an attorney.

A legal professional can help you understand if you have a claim against your creditor, for example. That person might also be able to advise you about other options, including debt settlement, if you do owe any money.

If you ended up here because you just discovered inaccurate information on your report, consider credit repair services from providers such as Lexington Law or CreditRepair.com. And if you have no idea what’s on your credit report, consider signing up for a service such as ExtraCredit to stay as informed as possible.

Disclosure: Credit.com and CreditRepair.com are both owned by the same company, Progrexion Holdings Inc. John C Heath, Attorney at Law, PC, d/b/a Lexington Law Firm is an independent law firm that uses Progrexion as a provider of business and administrative services.]

The post Can I Sue a Company for Sending Me to Collections? appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com